Posts Tagged ‘systemc’

4 October, 2013

We are truly living in the age of SoC design, where 78 percent of all designs today contain one or more embedded processors.  In fact, 56 percent of all designs contain two or more embedded processors, which brings a whole new level of verification challenges—requiring unique solutions.

A great example of this is STMicroelectronics who recently shared their experience and solution in addressing verification challenges due to rising complexity. In 2012, STMicroelectronics began a pilot project to build what it called the Eagle Reference Design, or ERD. The goal was to see if it would be possible to stitch together three ARM products — a Cortex-A15, Cortex-7 and DMC 400 — into one highly flexible platform, one that customers might eventually be able to tweak based on nothing more than an XML description of the system.

Engineers at STMicroelectronics sought to understand and benchmark the Eagle Reference Design. To speed this benchmarking along, they wanted a verification environment that would link software-based simulation and hardware-based emulation in a common flow.

Their solution was unique, and their story worth reading. They first built a simulation testbench that relied heavily on verification IP (VIP). Next, the team connected this testbench to a Veloce emulation system via TestBench XPress (TBX) co-modeling software. Running verification required separating all blocks of design code into two domains — synthesizable code, including all RTL, for running on the emulator; and all other modules that run on the HDL portion of the environment on the simulator (which is connected to the emulator). Throughout the project, the team worked closely with Mentor Graphics to fine-tune the new co-emulation verification environment, which requires that all SoC components be mapped exactly the same way in simulation and emulation.

Because the reference design was not bound to any particular project, the main goal was not to arrive at the complete verification of the design but rather to do performance analysis and establish verification methodologies and techniques that would work in the future. In this they succeeded, agreeing that when they eventually try this sort of combined approach on a real project, they will be able to port the verification environment to the emulator more or less seamlessly.

This is a great success story worth reading on how STMicroelectronics combined Questa simulation, Mentor verification IP (VIP), and Veloce emulation to speed up their benchmarking verification process. Check out the full story here!

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5 August, 2013

Language and Library Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs that present the highlights from the 2012 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (for a background on the study, click here).

In my previous blog (Part 7 click here), I focused on some of the 2012 Wilson Research Group findings related to testbench characteristics and simulation strategies. In this blog, I present design and verification language trends, as identified by the Wilson Research Group study.

You might note that for some of the language and library data I present, the percentage sums to more than one hundred percent. The reason for this is that some participants’ projects use multiple languages.

RTL Design Languages

Let’s begin by examining the languages used for RTL design. Figure 1 shows the trends in terms of languages used for design, by comparing the 2007 Far West Research study (in gray), the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in blue), the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in green), as well as the projected design language adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple) as identified by the study participants. Note that the design language adoption is declining for most of the languages with the exception of SystemVerilog whose adoption continues to increase.

Also, it’s important to note that this study focused on languages used for RTL design. We have conducted a few informal studies related to languages used for architectural modeling—and it’s not too big of a surprise that we see increased adoption of C/C++ and SystemC in that space. However, since those studies have (thus far) been informal and not as rigorously executed as the Wilson Research Group study, I have decided to withhold that data until a more formal blind study can be executed related to architectural modeling and virtual prototyping.

Figure 1. Trends in languages used for Non-FPGA design

Let’s now look at the languages used specifically for FPGA RTL design. Figure 2 shows the trends in terms of languages used for FPGA design, by comparing the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in red) with the projected design language adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple).

Figure 2. Languages used for Non-FPGA design

It’s not too big of a surprise that VHDL is the predominant language used for FPGA RTL design, although we are starting to see increased interest in SystemVerilog.

Verification Languages

Next, let’s look at the languages used to verify Non-FPGA designs (that is, languages used to create simulation testbenches). Figure 3 shows the trends in terms of languages used to create simulation testbenches by comparing the 2007 Far West Research study (in gray), the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in blue), and the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in green).

Figure 3. Trends in languages used in verification to create Non-FPGA simulation testbenches

The study revealed that verification language adoption is declining for most of the languages with the exception of SystemVerilog whose adoption is increasing. In fact, SystemVerilog adoption increased by 8.3 percent between 2010 and 2012.

Figure 4 provides a different analysis of the data by partitioning the projects by design size, and then calculating the adoption of SystemVerilog for creating testbenches by size. The design size partitions are represented as: less than 5M gates, 5M to 20M gates, and greater than 20M gates. Obviously, we find that the larger the design size, the greater the adoption of SystemVerilog for creating testbenches. Yet, probably the most interesting observation we can make from examining Figure 4 is related to smaller designs that are less than 5M gates. Here we see that 58.8 percent of the industry has adopted SystemVerilog for verification. In other words, it is safe to say that SystemVerilog for verification has become mainstream today and not just limited to early adopters or leading-edge design projects.

Figure 4. SystemVerilog (for verification) adoption by design size

Let’s now look at the languages used specifically for FPGA RTL design. Figure 5 shows the trends in terms of languages used for FPGA design, by comparing the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in red) with the projected design language adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple).

Figure 5. Trends in languages used in verification to create FPGA simulation testbenches

In my next blog (click here), I’ll continue the discussion on design and verification language trends as revealed by the 2012 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study.

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25 February, 2013

Download the standard now – at no charge!

The IEEE has published the latest update to the SystemVerilog standard.  And courtesy of Accellera, the standard is available for download without charge directly from the IEEE.

1800-2012 1

The latest update to the SystemVerilog standard is now ready for download.  It joins other EDA standards, like SystemC in the IEEE Get™ program that grants public access to view and download current individual standards at no charge as a PDF.  (If you wish to have an older, superseded and withdrawn version of the standard or if you wish to have a printed copy or have it in a CD-ROM format, you can purchase older and alternate formats from IEEE for a fee.)

Over the years Accellera came to understand that many people continued to use the freely available version that seeded the initial IEEE 1800 SystemVerilog standard.  Since it is significantly out of date, Accellera collaborated with the IEEE Standards Association to ensure the latest version of the SystemVerilog standard would be freely available in electronic form to all whom wish to download it.  Accellera now hopes all those old 3.1a versions that everyone has and uses can now be placed in the archives.

The new version of standard should be used by the UVM (Universal Verification Methodology) community as the definitive specification of the SystemVerilog standard upon which UVM is built.   It goes very well with the UVM Cookbook and the Coverage Cookbook.

From Mentor’s perspective, it also makes a good companion to the Questa verification platform and complements our latest product update in which we announced support for the IEEE 1800-2012 SystemVerilog standard among other things.

If you have not done so already, download your copy now by clicking here.

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10 September, 2012

OVM Bridges SystemVerilog and SystemC Languages

When UVM Connect was first released, the multilingual connection between IEEE Std. 1800™ (SystemVerilog) and IEEE Std. 1666™ (SystemC) standards bridged the two languages to allow design and verification engineers to access UVM from SystemC or SystemVerilog to exploit native languages advantages.  OVM users wondered if it was possible to support them as well since OVM is a derived from UVM.

It is possible and UVM Connect has been extended to allow OVM users to enjoy the same benefits.  An update to UVM Connect now allows it to be compiled to run with the OVM.  And since the extensions are based on IEEE standards, they can be used in your simulator of choice.

OVM Thrives

The thriving OVM community is of no surprise.  Last year, Harry Foster blogged about research on the use and adoption of verification methodologies.  The research was done after UVM was established as an Accellera standard, and showed OVM continued its leading position as shown in one of the charts from Harry’s blog (see below).  The chart even showed OVM was predicted to have a modest growth in adoption as well.

Mentor continues to bring many of the UVM additions back to the OVM user community in a way that does not disturb the upgrade path from OVM to UVM.  The major addition to UVM in the first round of Accellera standardization was the addition of a register and memory package.  This was back ported to OVM.  (The OVM register and memory kit can be found here, if you are interested.)  Now, UVM Connect has been extended to provide full OVM use.

Download

The UVM Connect 2.2 kit supports multilingual use of OVM and can be found at the Verification Academy and the Accellera UVM World contributions download site.

If you find issues or have other suggestions that we should consider, you can always share your input at the OVM Forum or UVM Forum.  In addition to interacting with other users, the Verification Academy is a good site for online resources like the UVM/OVM Cookbook, basic and advanced OVM/UVM training, and more.

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16 July, 2012

Open-Source Proof-of-Concept Library Released

Accellera Systems Initiative has released for general industry use an open-source proof-of-concept library as a companion to the recently minted IEEE Std. 1666™-2011, SystemC Language Reference Manual standard

In November 2011, the IEEE Standards Association approved IEEE Std. 1666-2011.  The completed and published standard was made available to the community as a whole for free in an agreement between Accellera Systems Initiative and the IEEE Standards Association in February 2012.   As a reminder, you can download your personal copy of IEEE 1666 here for free.

IEEE 1666-2011In the nearly 6 months since this version of the standard has been available about 7,000 copies have been downloaded under the IEEE Get program.

The previous version was also made available for free download and was just as popular as this version of the standard is.

1666-2011_Page_001While the approved standard was being made ready for publication, Accellera Systems Initiative was also busy completing the open-source proof-of-concept library.  After taking comments and feedback from a public review process, version 2.3.0 of the library was completed and is now available.

IEEE 1666-2011 added a number of important new features, including support for transaction-level modeling (TLM) that has proven to be an important element to enable high-level design and is a key component upon which the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) is built from.

For those who want to used the SystemC library directly, it is now available for wide industry access.

Download Resources

The downloads from the IEEE and Accellera Systems Initiative will require some license agreement approvals.  The links are not one-click access to the material below.

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30 May, 2012

Where might our paths cross?

It is always challenge to fit all the needed visits in during the Design Automation Conference (DAC).  If you happen to like some of the same events I attend, then the chances are good our paths might cross in public.

Saturday and Sunday are busy with an Accellera Systems Initiative board meeting.  Split across two days, Accellera board members will meet to conduct traditional business and  do some strategic planning in which each board member outlines what they aspire the goals and objectives for the group should be in the coming year.  Intel has graciously granted space in their San Francisco offices, so I won’t be around the Moscone Center during the pre-conference setup phase.  (By the way, Thank you Intel!)
After we close the Accellera board meeting on Sunday, I plan to attend the pre-DAC events on Sunday that include the EDAC reception (registration required) at 6:00pm  (San Francisco Marriott, Salon 7) and Gary Smith’s “Sunday Night at DAC” at 7:00pm (San Francisco Marriott, Salon 6).

During the conference I will spend most of my time at the Mentor Graphics Verification Academy Booth  #1514 and on Wednesday split my time between there and the Accellera Systems Imitative meetings.  And just in case you may note that most of my evenings are not scheduled, they are with customer activities.

MentorGraphics-LogoWhen the show floor is open, you will find me most of the time at the Verification Academy Booth #1514.  I will join Mentor’s Harry Foster there were user and partner presentations will be done on UVM applications, updates on Harry’s research results, updates on important verification standards from Mentor’s perspective and more.  You are invited to join other verification experts for the Tuesday evening cocktail reception at the Verification Academy Booth.  (And the cocktail hour may be just the thing that tis needed before the annual DAC Birds-Of-A-Feather meetings begin to help the conversations start.)

Verification Academy DAC Schedule

Monday, June 4th Tuesday, June 5th Wednesday, June 6th
10:00 – Simulation and Formal Assertion-Based Verification
Harry Foster, Mentor Graphics
9:30 – Using the UVM Register Layer
John Aynsley, Doulos
10:00 – Bringing UVM to Life
Ellie Burns, Mentor Graphics
11:00 – Bringing UVM to Life
Ellie Burns, Mentor Graphics
10:00 – Generating Coverage Models and Achieving Coverage Closure
Mark Olen, Mentor Graphics
11:00 – Resistance is Futile: Learning to love UVM!
Mike Bartley, Test & Verification Solutions
2:00 – Verification of Low Power SoCs with IEEE UPF
Stephen Bailey, Mentor Graphics
2:00 – Bringing UVM to Life
Ellie Burns, Mentor Graphics
2:00 – Automating Assertion Based Verification with NextOp and Mentor Graphics
Yunshan Zhu, NextOp
3:00 – Evolving Trends in Functional Verification
Harry Foster, Mentor Graphics
3:00 – Evolving Trends in Functional Verification
Harry Foster, Mentor Graphics
3:00 – UVM Express
Mike Baird, Willamette HDL, Inc.
4:00 – An Introduction to AMBA 4 AXI Coherency Extensions (ACE) and Verification Challenges
Paul Martin, ARM
4:00 – Evolving Trends in Functional Verification
Harry Foster, Mentor Graphics
5:00 – Using Rules-Based Integration to Develop a SoC-Level UVM Verification Environment
David Murray, Duolog
5:00 – Meet the Verification Experts Cocktail Reception

Accellera logo_color_200x111 - CopyAccellera Systems Initiative will host a set of meetings on Wednesday starting with a luncheon to roll out the Unified Coverage Operability Standard (UCIS).  The lunch is free and seating is limited and registration is required.

Hosted Luncheon and Technical Presentation

Accellera Systems Initiative Rolls Out the Unified Coverage Interoperability Standard


Speaker: Dr. Richard Ho, Co-Chair of the UCIS Technical Subcommittee

Wednesday, June 6, 12:00-1:30pm
Moscone Center, Room 250
Register Now >
This luncheon is open to all DAC attendees. Seating is limited! You must pre-register for this event.

Coverage metrics are critical to measuring and guiding design verification. As designs have grown, increasingly advanced verification technologies, methods and additional metrics have been designed to form a fuller coverage model. There is currently no single metric that consistently and globally tells engineers the exact status of verification. But one step in the right direction is to bring all types of coverage metrics into a single database that can be accessed in an industry standard way. The UCIS facilitates the creation of a unified coverage database that allows for interoperability of coverage data across multiple tools from multiple vendors.

This presentation, intended for verification managers and tool developers alike, provides an introduction to and overview of the UCIS and how users plan to utilize it to enhance their verification flows. We provide a survey of many of the commonly-used coverage metrics and how they are modeled in the UCIS. The information that users will be able to access through the UCIS will allow them to write their own applications to analyze, grade, merge and report coverage from one or more databases from one or more tool vendors. We will also discuss the XML-based interchange format of UCIS, which provides a path to exchange coverage databases without requiring a common code library between tools and vendors.

SystemC User Group Meeting

NASCUG XVIII

North American SystemC User’s Group Meeting
Wednesday, June 6, 2:00-6:00pm
Moscone Center, Room 262
Register Now >
This event is open to all DAC attendees. Seating is limited!

The North American SystemC Users Group (NASCUG) provides a unique forum for sharing SystemC experiences and knowledge among industry, research and universities. The agendafor the event has a lot offer user group attendees.

Mentor’s Adam Erickson will present An Open-Source, Standards-Based Library for Achieving Interoperability Between TLM Models in SystemC and SystemVerilog.  Adam’s presentation is scheduled to start at 3:00pm.

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22 February, 2012

In his recent post on UVM: Some Thoughts Before DVCon, Dennis outlined some great ideas about what we think should happen next for UVM. His 3rd point, “UVM needs to bridge the system domain,” is particularly relevant given the newly-formed Accellera Systems Initiative. This is actually an area we’ve been contemplating for a while here at Mentor, and as Dennis indicated, we shared our thoughts on this topic at our last face-to-face with the VIP-TSC.  With demand coming from our users, and some positive feedback on our proposal, we have just released UVM Connect, an open-source library that provides TLM1 and TLM2 connectivity and object passing between SystemC and SystemVerilog models and components, as well as a UVM Command API for accessing and controlling UVM simulation from SystemC (or C or C++).

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You can find much more information on the UVM Connect page of Verification Academy.

Mentor has always believed that SystemVerilog and SystemC each have their own strengths and that the most productive way to combine them in a system-level environment is to preserve the strengths of each while allowing the free exchange of data between them. Instead of trying to re-implement UVM in SystemC, or to extend SystemC to try and recreate SystemVerilog functional coverage or constrained-random stimulus, UVM Connect provides the framework needed to interoperate between languages. This lets you:

  • Reuse your SystemC architectural models as reference models in UVM verification
  • Reuse your stimulus generation agents in SystemVerilog to verify models in SystemC
  • Have access to a wider array of VIP since you are no longer confined to a single language
  • Utilize and interact with the UVM infrastructure from SystemC, including wait for and control UVM phase transitions, set and get configuration, issue UVM-style reports, set factory type and instance overrides, and more

UVM Connect provides object-based data transfer across the language boundary via TLM1 and TLM2 interfaces, which are natively supported in both languages. It works out-of-the-box with UVM 1.1a and later and lets you use your existing TLM models, regardless of language, in a mixed-language context without modification. In a nutshell, UVM Connect fulfills the principles and purpose of the TLM interface standard, letting you design independent models that communicate without directly referring to each other. The models thus work equally well in both native and mixed-language environments.I encourage you to download the kit and give it a try. In the spirit of “co-op-etition” I also encourage our competitors to qualify the library on their simulators.

In addition to the great material in the UVM/OVM Online Methodology Cookbook on Verification Academy, the kit also includes an HTML User’s Guide, based on extensive, well-documented examples, that includes detailed information on all aspects of the API. Please make sure to stop by the Mentor booth at DVCon and let us know what you think.

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17 February, 2012

It is time to talk about what happens next with UVM

uvm 2The Design and Verification Conference (DVCon) has become the premier event to discuss front-end design issues with an emphasis on verification.  If one listens to the Conversation Central interview of DVCon leadership it is clear how singularly important DVCon is.  As one of the three organizers of the UVM Tutorial on Monday, I know the conference organizers had to rearrange the room layout to accommodate a greater than expected number of registrant.  It is clear how important the topic of verification is and UVM in particular has become.

It seems to me that DVCon is the right place to discuss what comes next with UVM.  I have three thoughts about UVM that I think merit discussion.

1. UVM needs a period of stability

While the experts at the Accellera Verification IP Technical Subcommittee (VIP-TSC) standardization table (all good people) continue to hone UVM and debate a few more features they need, they have been unable to make significant progress on those features since last DVCon.  The one major item promised beyond OVM, an update to phasing, remains an open topic.  Mentor has suggested in committee that we allow another year to pass and suspend committee action on this.  Maybe the natural market forces would allow several options to surface, be user-tested and then merit consideration by the VIP-TSC.

This is in keeping with Karen Bartleson’s 9th Commandment for Effective Standards: “Start with Donations; Not From Scratch.”  This is what is happening now with Phasing.  The design by committee process is moving slowly.  It is not the slow part that concerns me, however.

Completing the “last” thing has many in the verification community waiting until it is done before they migrate and adopt UVM.  The best thing the committee could do to encourage use is to give the users certainty that UVM will not change in the next 12 months.  At the same time, the committee could commit to take input from users at the end of those 12 months as a guide to what it does next.

2. UVM needs a simple path to first use

Accellera has an approved and published standard, an open-source implementation and embedded UVM User’s Guide.  This is a lot to digest.  And while one may expect the User’s Guide to help, it calls the reader to supplement it with “education, experience and professional judgment.”  It warns that “not all aspects of this guide may be applicable in all circumstances.”

Users should be offered an unambiguous, easy-to-use and understand means to adopt UVM without having to know everything about it before starting to use it.  UVM was not made for just those who have large verification teams and central CAD groups.  Those large teams are the ones who are already using UVM.  The first step to UVM adoption for the rest of the world should not be too high as it currently is.

UVM needs a simple path for fast adoption.

3. UVM needs to bridge the system domain

Accellera System Initiative has come to life from the unification of Accellera and OSCI.  While the vision to bring the two organizations together is without fault, the lack of a publicly visible plan to leverage each others strengths is noted by Gabe Moretti in his recent blog on DVCon when he wrote: “First we build it and then we figure out how to use it has never been a good architectural approach, especially in electronics.”  His comment was in response to the questions to be asked at DVCon’s Monday lunch about what the new organization should look like.  Gabe certainly thought “the creators of the organization must have some ideas of the focus, mission and goals.”

I certainly do.  In the case of UVM, I think it needs a bridge between the SystemVerilog world in which it was written and the SystemC world of design and modeling.  As teams move to higher levels of abstraction for system-level architectural exploration and definition, the need for efficient and reusable functional models has become an imperative.

It is no secret to the Accellera VIP-TSC that Mentor Graphics thinks this is needed.  Our presentation to committee members on a UVM API to facilitate this outlines exactly what we think should be done to address reusable functional models in the system world.  [Accellera requires registration to download the Mentor presentation.  Accellera members can register here.  Guests require VIP-TSC leadership permission and can request it here.]

UVM must grow and bridge the system world.  The Accellera SystemC Verification Working Group (VWG) knows this.  They have a meeting planned at the DATE conference to discuss future evolutions related to SystemC and Verification on 14 March 2012 from 1230-1340 in Conference Room 4 which I plan to attend.  The VWG meeting is open to external participants, not just Accellera members.

Summary

I don’t know what your thoughts about what should happen next with UVM are.  Feel free to share them here if you wish or join me at DVCon or DATE and we can discuss it with the whole community.  Maybe there is hope we can make progress on these three areas in the coming year.

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16 January, 2012

IEEE Std. 1666™-2011 Available as Free Download

In November 2011 I blogged the IEEE Standards Association (SA) approved a revision to the popular SystemC standard, known officially as IEEE Std. 1666™-2011.  One of the key elements of this standard includes the addition of Transaction Level Modeling (TLM).  I pointed to several online resources to learn more about the revised SystemC standard in that blog.  But missing from the list of resources was information on how to get the revised standard from the IEEE.  As I concluded my blog, I indicated that the final editorial review and formatting for publication was underway and that I would report back when this work was completed.

IEEE Std 1666-2011I can report that the IEEE SA concluded their editing of the specification and it is now ready for download.  Many of you know the prior version of the SystemC standard was available for free download and have wondered if this would be the same for this revision update.  The good news is the revision update is available as a free download as well.  If you wish to have a printed and bound copy, that too is available, but that will have to be purchased.

IEEE Std. 1666-2011 is part of the “IEEE Get Program” that offers individuals the ability to retrieve, download and print one copy of the standard for free.  Click on the link above to get your personal copy of the standard.  You will need to share some basic information with the IEEE on your user type (Academic, System/Semiconductor Company,  EDA Company, IP Company or Other).  This is certainly worth if for a free copy.

The original standard, IEEE Std. 1666™-2005, had more than 50,000 free downloads since it was made available and I expect this version to do even better.  With the addition of TLM to the standard and the move up in abstraction to handle system design requirements, the need for this standard is even more pressing today.

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10 November, 2011

IEEE Announces Revision to IEEE 1666™ – Adds Transaction-Level Modeling Support

A significant step forward to address standards for advanced system-on-chip (SoC) designs has taken place by the IEEE.  The IEEE announced the new revision of the SystemC standard, known as IEEE 1666™-2011, has been approved.  While it is a revision of the current SystemC standard, IEEE 1666™-2005, the major new feature added was Transaction-Level Modeling (TLM), which is new to an IEEE standard.

For many years now, the TLM specification and accompanying open source code has been incubating in the Open SystemC Initiative (OSCI).  OSCI’s TLM Working Group has developed the TLM 1.0 and TLM 2.0 specifications, both of which are part of the revised IEEE 1666 standard.  TLM is important to SystemC, but it has also been leveraged outside of it.

We at Mentor Graphics pioneered the use of TLM in SystemVerilog (IEEE 1800™-2009) when our seminal open-source work on the Advanced Verification Methodology (AVM) brought an implementation to the verification community based on SystemVerilog.  This lives on today, as AVM motivated the Open Verification Methodology (OVM), which became the basis for Accellera’s Universal Verification Methodology (UVM).

If you don’t already know what TLM is and how the verification community is using it in OVM and UVM, the Verification Academy has a lot of written material and video training modules that will help you learn how this important new IEEE standard is used from simulation to emulation and has boosted verification productivity.  The “Understanding TLM” module is featured in the Advanced UVM section, so if you are still a novice to UVM, you may wish to start with the Basic material first.  This module is presented by fellow Verification Horizons Blogger, Tom Fitzpatrick and offers subtitles in English, Russian, Japanese and Chinese (Traditional & Simplified) to help drive rapid global adoption.

As we brought TLM into the modern verification methodology practice with a SystemVerilog implementation, it also surfaced that there is an opportunity for the creator of TLM, OSCI, and an adopter of it in UVM, Accellera, to discuss what they could do together.  And as I’ve blogged before, those two organizations announced their intention to unite before the end of 2011, as others have seen the potential when both are brought together.  I expect to see more great ideas come from these two groups when they join forces, just like the TLM work that is now an IEEE standard.

For those who want a copy of the revised IEEE 1666 standard, it is still in final IEEE editorial review as the they do their last formatting.  I will share with you when it is ready to use as well as how to get it and where to find it.

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