Posts Tagged ‘Coverage’

3 January, 2017

Deeper Dive into First Silicon Success and Safety Critical Designs

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here).  In my previous blog (click here), I presented verification results in terms of schedules, number of required spins, and classification of functional bugs. In this blog, I conclude the series by having a little fun with some of the findings from our recent study.

You might recall from our 2014 study we did a deeper dive into the findings made a non-intuitive observation related to design size and first silicon success. That is, the smaller the design the less likelihood of achieving first silicon success (see 2014 conclusion blog for details). This observation still holds true in 2016.

For our 2016 study, we decided to do a deeper dive related to the following:

  1. Verification maturity and silicon success, and
  2. Safety critical designs and silicon successes.

Verification Maturity and Silicon Success

Figure 1 presents the findings for ASIC/IC first silicon success, and Figure 2 presents the findings for FPGA non-trivial bug escapes into production. It is important to note that only 33 percent of ASIC/IC projects are able to achieve first silicon success, and only 22 percent of FPGA projects go into production without a non-trivial bug.

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Figure 1. ASIC/IC required spins before final production

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Figure 2. FPGA non-trivial bug escapes into production

A question worth asking is if there might be some correlation between project success (in terms of preventing bugs) and verification maturity. To answer this question we looked at verification technology adoption trends related to a project’s silicon success.

Figure 3 presents the adoption of various verification techniques related to ASIC/IC projects, and then correlates these results against achieving first silicon success. The data suggest that the more mature an ASIC/IC project is in its adoption of verification technology the more likelihood of achieving first silicon success.

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Figure 3. ASIC/IC spins and verification maturity.

Similarly, in Figure 4 we examine the adoption of various verification techniques on FPGA projects, and then correlate these results against preventing non-trivial bug escapes into production. Again, the data suggest that the more mature an FPGA project is in its adoption of verification technology the more likelihood that a non-trivial bug will not escape into production.

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Figure 4. FPGA non-trivial bug escapes into production and verification maturity.

Safety Critical Designs and Silicon Success

The second aspect of our 2016 study that we decided to examine a little deeper relates to safety critical designs and their silicon success. Intuitively, one might think that the rigid and structured process required to adhere to one of the safety critical development processes (such as, DO-254 for mil/aero, ISO 26262 for automotive, IEC 60601 for medical, etc.) would yield higher quality in terms of preventing bugs and achieving silicon success.

Figure 5 shows the percentage of ASIC/IC and FPGA projects that claimed to be working on a safety critical design.

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Figure 5. Percentage of projects working on safety critical designs

Keep in mind that the findings in Figure 5 do not represent volume in terms of silicon production—the data represents projects that claim to work under one of the safety critical development process standards.  Using this partition between projects working on non-safety critical and safety critical designs we decided to see how these two classes of projects compared in terms of preventing bugs.

Figure 6 compares the number of required spins for both safety critical and non-safety critical ASIC/IC designs. While Figure 7 compares the FPGA designs with non-trivial bug escapes for both safety critical and non-safety critical designs.

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Figure 6. Requires ASIC/IC spins for safety critical vs. non-safety critical designs

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Figure 7. Non-trivial bug escapes for safety critical vs. non-safety critical FPGA designs

Clearly, the data suggest that a development process adopted to ensure safety does not necessarily ensure quality. Perhaps this is non-intuitive. However, to be fair, many of the safety critical features implemented in today’s designs are quite complex and increase the verification burden.

This concludes the findings from the 2016 Wilson Research Group Study.

Quick links to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Study results

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31 October, 2016

ASIC/IC Language and Library Adoption Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here).  In my previous blog (click here), I focused on I various verification technology adoption trends. In this blog I plan to discuss various ASIC/IC language and library adoption trends..

Figure 1 shows the adoption trends for languages used to create RTL designs. Essentially, the adoption rates for all languages used to create RTL designs is projected to be either declining or flat over the next year.

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Figure 1. ASIC/IC Languages Used for RTL Design

As previously noted, the reason some of the results sum to more than 100 percent is that some projects are using multiple languages; thus, individual projects can have multiple answers.

Figure 2 shows the adoption trends for languages used to create ASIC/IC testbenches. Essentially, the adoption rates for all languages used to create testbenches are either declining or flat. Furthermore, the data suggest that SystemVerilog adoption is starting to saturate or level off in the mid-70s range.

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Figure 2. ASIC/IC Languages Used for  Verification (Testbenches)

Figure 3 shows the adoption trends for various ASIC/IC testbench methodologies built using class libraries.

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Figure 3. ASIC/IC Methodologies and Testbench Base-Class Libraries

Here we see a decline in adoption of all methodologies and class libraries with the exception of Accellera’s UVM, whose adoption continued to increase between 2014 and 2016. Furthermore, our study revealed that UVM is projected to continue its growth over the next year. However, like SystemVerlog, it will likely start to level off in the mid- to upper-70 percent range.

Figure 4 shows the ASIC/IC industry adoption trends for various assertion languages, and again, SystemVerilog Assertions seems to have saturated or leveled off.

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Figure 4. ASIC/IC Assertion Language Adoption

In my next blog (click here) I plan to present the ASIC/IC design and verification power trends.

Quick links to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Study results

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10 October, 2016

ASIC/IC Verification Technology Adoption Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here).  In my previous blog (click here), I focused on the growing ASIC/IC design project resource trends due to rising design complexity. In this blog I examine various verification technology adoption trends.

Dynamic Verification Techniques

Figure 1 shows the ASIC/IC adoption trends for various simulation-based techniques from 2007 through 2016, which include code coverage, assertions, functional coverage, and constrained-random simulation.

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Figure 1. ASIC/IC Dynamic Verification Technology Adoption Trends

One observation from these adoption trends is that the ASIC/IC electronic design industry has matured its verification processes. This maturity is likely due to the growing complexity of designs as discussed in the previous section. Another observation is that constrained-random simulation and code coverage adoption appears to have declined. However, as I mentioned in Part 7 (click here) one interesting observation for this year’s study is that there was a large increase in design projects working on designs less than 100K gates, perhaps is due to an increased number of projects working on smaller sensor chips for IoT devices. Nonetheless, it is important to keep in mind that very small projects do not apply advanced verification techniques, which can bias the overall industry verification technique adoption trends in some cases. Hence, in reality the adoption of constrained-random simulation and code coverage has actually leveled off (versus declined) if you ignore these very small devices.

Another reason constrained-random simulation has leveled off is due to its scaling limitations. Constrained-random simulation generally works well at the IP block or subsystem level, but does not scale to the entire SoC integration level.

ASIC/IC Static Verification Techniques

Figure 2 shows the ASIC/IC adoption trends for formal property checking (e.g., model checking), as well as automatic formal applications (e.g., SoC integration connectivity checking, deadlock detection, X semantic safety checks, coverage reachability analysis, and many other properties that can be automatically extracted and then formally proven). Formal property checking traditionally has been a high-effort process requiring specialized skills and expertise. However, the recent emergence of automatic formal applications provides narrowly focused solutions and does not require specialized skills to adopt. While formal property checking adoption is experiencing incremental growth between 2012 and 2014, the adoption of automatic formal applications increased by 62 percent during this period. What was interesting in 2016 was that formal property checking experience a 31 percent increase since the 2014 study, while automatic formal applications was essentially flat, which I suspect is a temporary phenomenon. Regardless, if you calculate the compounded annual growth rate between 2012 and 2016, you see healthy adoption growth for both, as shown in Figure 2.

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Figure 2. ASIC/IC Formal Technology Adoption

Emulation and FPGA Prototyping

Historically, the simulation market has depended on processor frequency scaling as one means of continual improvement in simulation performance. However, as processor frequency scaling levels off, simulation-based techniques are unable to keep up with today’s growing complexity. This is particularly true when simulating large designs that include both software and embedded processor core models. Hence, acceleration techniques are now required to extend SoC verification performance for very large designs. In fact, emulation and FPGA prototyping have become key platforms for SoC integration verification where both hardware and software are integrated into a system for the first time. In addition to SoC verification, emulation and FPGA prototyping are also used today as a platform for software development.

Figure 3 describes various reasons why projects are using emulation, while Figure 4 describes why FPGA Prototyping was performed. You might note that the results do not sum to 100 percent since multiple answers were accepted from each study participant.

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Figure 3. Why Was Emulation Performed?

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Figure 4. Why Was FPGA Prototyping Performed?

Figure 5 partitions the data for emulation and FPGA prototyping adoption by the design size as follows: less than 5M gates, 5M to 80M gates, and greater than 80M gates. Notice that the adoption of emulation continues to increase as design sizes increase. However, the adoption of FPGA prototyping levels off as design sizes increase beyond 80M gates. Actually, the level-off point is more likely around 40M gates or so since this is the average capacity limit of many of today’s FPGAs. This graph illustrates one of the problems with adopting FPGA prototyping of very large designs. That is, there can be an increased engineering effort required to partition designs across multiple FPGAs. However, better FPGA partitioning solutions are now emerging from EDA to address these challenges. In addition, better FPGA debugging solutions are also emerging from EDA to address today’s lab visibility challenges. Hence, I anticipate seeing an increase in adoption of FPGA prototyping for larger gate counts as time goes forward.

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Figure 5. Emulation and FPGA Prototyping Adoption by Design Size

In my next blog (click here) I plan to discuss various ASIC/IC language and library adoption trends.

Quick links to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Study results

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21 September, 2016

FPGA Language and Library Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here).  In my previous blog (click here), I focused on FPGA verification techniques and technologies adoption trends, as identified by the 2016 Wilson Research Group study. In this blog, I’ll present FPGA design and verification language trends.

You might note that the percentage for some of the language that I present sums to more than one hundred percent. The reason for this is that many FPGA projects today use multiple languages.

FPGA RTL Design Language Adoption Trends

Let’s begin by examining the languages used for FPGA RTL design. Figure 1 shows the trends in terms of languages used for design, by comparing the 2012, 2014, and 2016 Wilson Research Group study, as well as the projected design language adoption trends within the next twelve months. Note that the language adoption is declining for most of the languages used for FPGA design with the exception of Verilog and SystemVerilog.

Also, it’s important to note that this study focused on languages used for RTL design. We have conducted a few informal studies related to languages used for architectural modeling—and it’s not too big of a surprise that we see increased adoption of C/C++ and SystemC in that space. However, since those studies have (thus far) been informal and not as rigorously executed as the Wilson Research Group study, I have decided to withhold that data until a more formal study can be executed related to architectural modeling and virtual prototyping.

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Figure 1. Trends in languages used for FPGA design

It’s not too big of a surprise that VHDL is the predominant language used for FPGA RTL design, although it is slowly declining when viewed as a worldwide trend. An important note here is that if you were to filter the results down by a particular market segment or region of the world, you would find different results. For example, if you only look at Europe, you would find that VHDL adoption as an FPGA design language is about 79 percent, while the world average is 62 percent. However, I believe that it is important to examine worldwide trends to get a sense of where the industry is moving in the future.

FPGA Verification Language Adoption Trends

Next, let’s look at the languages used to verify FPGA designs (that is, languages used to create simulation testbenches). Figure 2 shows the trends in terms of languages used to create simulation testbenches by comparing the 2012, 2014, and 2016 Wilson Research Group study, as well as the projected verification language adoption trends within the next twelve months.

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Figure 2. Trends in languages used in verification to create FPGA simulation testbenches

What is interesting in 2016 is that SystemVerilog overtook VHDL as the language of choice for building FPGA testbenches. But please note that the same comment related to design language adoption applies to verification language adoption. That is, if you were to filter the results down by a particular market segment or region of the world, you would find different results. For example, if you only look at Europe, you would find that VHDL adoption as an FPGA verification language is about 66 percent (greater than the worldwide average), while SystemVerilog adoption is 41 percent (less than the worldwide average).

FPGA Testbench Methodology Class Library Adoption Trends

Now let’s look at testbench methodology and class library adoption for FPGA designs. Figure 3 shows the trends in terms of methodology and class library adoption by comparing the 2012, 2014, and 2016 Wilson Research Group study, as well as the projected verification language adoption trends within the next twelve months.

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Figure 3. FPGA methodology and class library adoption trends

Today, we see a basically a flat or downward trend in terms of adoption of all testbench methodologies and class libraries with the exception of UVM, which has been growing at a healthy 10.7 percent compounded annual growth rate. The study participants were also asked what they plan to use within the next 12 months, and based on the responses, UVM is projected to increase an additional 12.5 percent.

By the way, to be fair, we did get a few write-in methodologies, such as OSVVM and UVVM that are based on VHDL. I did not list them in the previous figure since it would be difficult to predict an accurate adoption percentage. The reason for this is that they were not listed as a selection option on the original question, which resulted in a few write-in answers. Nonetheless, the data suggest that the industry momentum and focused has moved to SystemVerilog and UVM.

FPGA Assertion Language and Library Adoption Trends

Finally, let’s examine assertion language and library adoption for FPGA designs. The 2016 Wilson Research Group study found that 47 percent of all the FPGA projects have adopted assertion-based verification (ABV) as part of their verification strategy. The data presented in this section shows the assertion language and library adoption trends related to those participants who have adopted ABV.

Figure 4 shows the trends in terms of assertion language and library adoption by comparing the 2012, 2014, and 2016 Wilson Research Group study, and the projected adoption trends within the next 12 months. The adoption of SVA continues to increase, while other assertion languages and libraries are not trending at significant changes.

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Figure 4. Trends in assertion language and library adoption for FPGA designs

In my next blog (click here), I will shift the focus of this series of blogs and start to present the ASIC/IC findings from the 2016 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study.

Quick links to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Study results

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11 September, 2016

FPGA Verification Technology Adoption Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here). In my previous blog (click here), I focused on the effectiveness of verification in terms of FPGA project schedule and bug escapes. In this blog, I present verification techniques and technologies adoption trends, as identified by the 2016 Wilson Research Group study.

An interesting trend we see in the FPGA space is a continual maturing of its functional verification processes. In fact, we find that the FPGA design space is about where the ASIC/IC design space was five years ago in terms of verification maturity—and it is catching up quickly. A question you might ask is, “What is driving this trend?” In Part 1 of this blog series I showed rising design complexity with the adoption of more advanced FPGA designs, as well as multiple embedded processor architectures targeted at FPGA designs. In addition, I’ve presented trend data that showed an increase in total project time and effort spent in verification (Part 2 and Part 3). My belief is that the industry creating FPGA designs is being forced to mature its functional verification processes to address today’s increasing complexity.

FPGA Simulation Technique Adoption Trends

Let’s begin by comparing  FPGA adoption trends related to various simulation techniques from the both the 2012, 2014, and 2016 Wilson Research Group study, as shown in Figure 1.

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Figure 1. Simulation-based technique adoption trends for FPGA designs

You can clearly see that the industry is increasing its adoption of various functional verification techniques for FPGA targeted designs. This past year I have spent a significant amount of time in discussions with FPGA project managers around the world. During these discussions, most managers mention the drive to improve verification process within their projects due to rising complexity. The Wilson Research Group data suggest that these claims are valid.

FPGA Formal Technology Adoption Trends

Figure 2 shows the adoption trends for formal property checking and auto-formal techniques.

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Figure 2. FPGA Formal Technology Adoption

Our study looked at two forms of formal technology adoption (i.e., formal property checking and automatic formal verification solutions). Examples of automatic formal verification solutions (also referred to as formal apps) include X safety checks, deadlock detection, reset analysis, and so on.  The key difference is that for formal property checking the user writes a set of assertions that they wish to prove.  Automatic formal verification solutions do not require the user to write assertions. Again, the key take away here is that FPGA projects are maturing their verification processes to address growing design complexity.

In my next blog (click here), I’ll focus on FPGA design and verification language adoption trends, as identified by the 2016 Wilson Research Group study.

Quick links to the 2016 Wilson Research Group Study results

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22 August, 2015

Impact of Design Size on First Silicon Success

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here).  In my previous blog (click here), I present verification results findings in terms of schedules, number of required spins, and classification of functional bugs. In this blog, I conclude the series on the 2014 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study by providing a deeper analysis of respins by design size.

It’s generally assumed that the larger the design—the increased likelihood of the occurrence of bugs. Yet, a question worth answering is how effective projects are at finding these bugs prior to tapeout.

In Figure 1, we first extract the 2014 data from the required number of spins trends presented in my previous blog (click here), and then partition this data into sets based on design size (that is, designs less than 5 million gates, designs between 5 and 80 million gates, and designs greater than 80 million gates). This led to perhaps one of the most startling findings from our 2014 study. That is, the data suggest that the smaller the design—the less likelihood of achieving first silicon success! While 34 percent of the designs over 80 million gates achieve first silicon success, only 27 percent of the designs less than 5 million gates are able to achieve first silicon success. The difference is statistically significant.

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Figure 1. Number of spins by design size

To understand what factors might be contributing to this phenomena, we decided to apply the same partitioning technique while examining verification technology adoption trends.

Figure 2 shows the adoption trends for various verification techniques from 2007 through 2014, which include code coverage, assertions, functional coverage, and constrained-random simulation.

One observation we can make from these adoption trends is that the electronic design industry is maturing its verification processes. This maturity is likely due to the need to address the challenge of verifying designs with growing complexity.

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Figure 2. Verification Technology Adoption Trends

In Figure 3 we extract the 2014 data from the various verification technology adoptions trends presented in Figure 2, and then partition this data into sets based on design size (that is, designs less than 5 million gates, designs between 5 and 80 million gates, and designs greater than 80 million gates).

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Figure 3. Verification Technology Adoption by Design

Across the board we see that designs less than 5 million gates are less likely to adopt code coverage, assertions, functional coverage, and constrained-random simulation. Hence, if you correlate this data with the number of spins by design size (as shown in Figure 1), then the data suggest that the verification maturity of an organization has a significant influence on its ability to achieve first silicon success.

As a side note, you might have noticed that there is less adoption of constrained-random simulation for designs greater than 80 million gates. There are a few factors contributing to this behavior: (1) constrained-random works well at the IP and subsystem level, but does not scale to the full-chip level for large designs. (2) There a number of projects working on large designs that predominately focuses on integrating existing or purchased IPs. Hence, these types of projects focus more of their verification effort on integration and system validation task, and constrained-random simulation is rarely applied here.

So, to conclude this blog series, in general, the industry is maturing its verification processes as witnessed by the verification technology adoption trends. However, we found that smaller designs were less likely to adopt what is generally viewed as industry best verification practices and techniques. Similarly, we found that projects working on smaller designs tend to have a smaller ratio of peak verification engineers to peak designers. Could the fact that fewer available verification resources combined with the lack of adoption of more advanced verification techniques account for fewer small designs achieving first silicon success? The data suggest that this might be one contributing factor. It’s certainly something worth considering.

Quick links to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Study results

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19 July, 2015

ASIC/IC Verification Technology Adoption Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here).  In my previous blog (click here), I focused on the growing ASIC/IC design project resource trends due to rising design complexity. In this blog I examine various verification technology adoption trends.

Dynamic Verification Techniques

Figure 1 shows the ASIC/IC adoption trends for various simulation-based techniques from 2007 through 2014, which include code coverage, assertions, functional coverage, and constrained-random simulation.

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Figure 1. ASIC/IC Dynamic Verification Technology Adoption Trends

One observation from these adoption trends is that the electronic design industry is maturing its verification processes. This maturity is likely due to the growing complexity of designs as discussed in the previous section. Another observation is that constrained-random simulation adoption appears to be leveling off. This trend is likely due to the scaling limitations of constrained-random simulation. This technique generally works well at the IP block or subsystem level in simulation, but does not scale to the entire SoC integration level.

ASIC/IC Static Verification Techniques

Figure 2 shows the ASIC/IC adoption trends for formal property checking (e.g., model checking), as well as automatic formal applications (e.g., SoC integration connectivity checking, deadlock detection, X semantic safety checks, coverage reachability analysis, and many other properties that can be automatically extracted and then formally proven). Formal property checking traditionally has been a high-effort process requiring specialized skills and expertise. However, the recent emergence of automatic formal applications provides narrowly focused solutions and does not require specialized skills to adopt. While formal property checking adoption is experiencing incremental growth between 2012 and 2014, the adoption of automatic formal applications increased by 62 percent. In general, formal solutions (i.e., formal property checking combined with automatic formal applications) are one of the fastest growing segments in functional verification.

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Figure 2. ASIC/IC Formal Technology Adoption

Emulation and FPGA Prototyping

Historically, the simulation market has depended on processor frequency scaling as one means of continual improvement in simulation performance. However, as processor frequency scaling levels off, simulation-based techniques are unable to keep up with today’s growing complexity. This is particularly true when simulating large designs that include both software and embedded processor core models. Hence, acceleration techniques are now required to extend ASIC/IC verification performance for very large designs. In fact, emulation and FPGA prototyping have become key platforms for SoC integration verification where both hardware and software are integrated into a system for the first time. In addition to SoC verification, emulation and FPGA prototyping are also used today as a platform for software development.

Today, 35 percent of the industry has adopted emulation, while 33 percent of the industry has adopted FPGA prototyping. Figure 3 describes various reasons why projects are using these techniques. You might note that the results do not sum to 100 percent since multiple answers were accepted from each study participant. Also, we are unable to show trend analysis here since previous studies did not examine this aspect of functional verification.

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Figure 3. Why Was Emulation or FPGA Prototyping Used?

Figure 4 partitions the data for emulation and FPGA prototyping adoption by the design size as follows: less than 5M gates, 5M to 80M gates, and greater than 80M gates. Notice that the adoption of emulation continues to increase as design sizes increase. However, the adoption of FPGA prototyping rapidly drops off as design sizes increase beyond 80M gates. Actually, the drop-off point is more likely around 40M gates or so since this is the average capacity limit of many of today’s FPGAs. This graph illustrates one of the problems with adopting FPGA prototyping of very large designs. That is, there can be an increased engineering effort required to partition designs across multiple FPGAs. However, better FPGA partitioning solutions are now emerging from EDA to address these challenges. In addition, better FPGA debugging solutions are also emerging from EDA to address today’s lab visibility challenges. Hence, I anticipate seeing an increase in adoption of FPGA prototyping for larger gate counts as time goes forward.

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Figure 4. Emulation and FPGA Prototyping Adoption by Design Size

In my next blog (click here) I plan to discuss various ASIC/IC language and library adoption trends.

Quick links to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Study results

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11 May, 2015

FPGA Verification Technology Adoption Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here). In my previous blog (click here), I focused on the effectiveness of verification in terms of FPGA project schedule and bug escapes. In this blog, I present verification techniques and technologies adoption trends, as identified by the 2014 Wilson Research Group study.

An interesting trend we see in the FPGA space is a continual maturing of its functional verification processes. In fact, we find that the FPGA design space is about where the ASIC/IC design space was five years ago in terms of verification maturity—and it is catching up quickly. A question you might ask is, “What is driving this trend?” In Part 1 of this blog series I showed rising design complexity with the adoption of more advanced FPGA designs, as well as multiple embedded processor architectures targeted at FPGA designs. In addition, I’ve presented trend data that showed an increase in total project time and effort spent in verification (Part 2 and Part 3). My belief is that the industry creating FPGA designs is being forced to mature its functional verification processes to address today’s increasing complexity.

FPGA Simulation Technique Adoption Trends

Let’s begin by comparing  FPGA adoption trends related to various simulation techniques from the both the 2012 and 2014 Wilson Research Group study, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Simulation-based technique adoption trends for FPGA designs

You can clearly see that the industry is increasing its adoption of various functional verification techniques for FPGA targeted designs. This past year I have spent a significant amount of time in discussions with FPGA project managers around the world. During these discussions, most mangers mention the drive to improve verification process within their projects due to rising complexity. The Wilson Research Group data suggest that these claims are valid.

FPGA Formal Technology Adoption Trends

Figure w shows the adoption percentages for formal property checking and auto-formal techniques.

Figure 2. FPGA Formal Technology Adoption

Our study looked at two forms of formal technology adoption (i.e., formal property checking and automatic formal verification solutions). Examples of automatic formal verification solutions include X safety checks, deadlock detection, reset analysis, and so on.  The key difference is that for formal property checking the user writes a set of assertions that they wish to prove.  Automatic formal verification solutions do not require the user to write assertions.

In my next blog (click here), I’ll focus on FPGA design and verification language adoption trends, as identified by the 2014 Wilson Research Group study.

Quick links to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Study results

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17 March, 2015

StPatricksDay

With a name like “Fitzpatrick,” you knew I’d be celebrating today, right?

Well, there’s no better way to celebrate this fine day than to announce that our latest edition of Verification Horizons is available online! Now that Spring is almost here, there’s a bit less snow on the ground than there was when I wrote my introduction, but everything is still covered. I’m considering spray-painting it all green in honor of the occasion, so at least it looks like I have a lawn again.

In this issue of Verification Horizons, I’d particularly like to draw your attention to “Successive Refinement: A Methodology for Incremental Specification of Power Intent,” by my friend and colleague Erich Marschner and several of our friends at ARM® Ltd. In this article, you’ll find out how the Unified Power Format (UPF) specification can be used to specify and verify your power architecture abstractly, and then add implementation information later in the process. This methodology is still relatively new in the industry, so if you’re thinking about making your next design PowerAware, you’ll want to read this article to be up on the very latest approach.

In addition to that, we’ve also got Harry Foster discussing some of the results from his latest industry study in “Does Design Size Influence First Silicon Success?” Harry is also blogging about his survey results on Verification Horizons here and here (with more to come).

Our friends at L&T Technology Services Ltd. share some of their experience in doing PowerAware design in “PowerAware RTL Verification of USB 3.0 IPs,” in which you’ll see how UPF can let you explore two different power management architectures for the same RTL.

Next, History class is in session, with Dr. Lauro Rizzatti, long-time EDA guru, giving us part 1 of a 3-part lesson in “Hardware Emulation: Three Decades of Evolution.”

Our friends at Oracle® are up next with “Evolving the Use of Formal Model Checking in SoC Design Verification,” in which they share a case study of their use of formal methods as the central piece in verifying an SoC design they recently completed with first-pass silicon success. By the way, I’d also like to take this opportunity to congratulate the author of this article, Ram Narayan, for his Best Paper award at DVCon(US) 2015. Well done, Ram!

We round out the issue with our famous “Partners’ Corner” section, which includes two articles. In “Small, Maintainable Tests,” our friends at Sondrel IC Design Services show you a few tricks on how to make use of UVM virtual sequences to raise the level of abstraction of your tests. In “Functional Coverage Development Tips: Do’s and Don’ts,” our friends at eInfochips give you a great overview of functional coverage, especially the covergroup and related features in SystemVerilog.

I’d also like to take a moment to thank all of you who came by our Verification Academy booth at DVCon to say hi. I found it incredibly humbling and gratifying to hear from so many of you who have learned new verification skills from the Verification Academy. That’s a big part of why we do what we do, and I appreciate you letting us know about it.

Now, it’s time to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day for real!

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7 May, 2014

My Feb. 4 post introduced Mentor Graphics’ three-step FPGA verification process intended to help design teams get out of the reprogrammable lab more effectively. Since then, I’ve engaged FPGA vendors, design managers and engineers to explain the process, paying special attention to the merits and technical detail for injecting automation into any FPGA verification environment, the hallmark of Mentor’s process. The feedback from these conversations helped me to develop a series of technical webinars, now available for free and on-demand. Check them out and let us know what you think in the comments below. My hope is the webinars might serve as a starting point for your own conversations on verification of FPGAs, demand for which seems to continue to grow as process nodes shrink.

Injecting Automation into Verification – FPGA Market Trends

Injecting Automation into Verification – Code Coverage

Injecting Automation into Verification – Assertions

Injecting Automation into Verification – Improved Throughput

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