Posts Tagged ‘Self-test’

6 March, 2017

Next week, Tuesday-Thursday 14-16 March is Embedded World in Nuremberg, Germany. This is the biggest event in the world of embedded systems. I have been to the show and conference most years over the last decade and this year is no exception. The event is a very large trade show, along with a technical conference. It is the conference where I usually find myself most occupied … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , ,

14 November, 2016

Next week is the Embedded Conference Scandinavia [ECS], which takes place in Kista – a suburb of Stockholm, Sweden.

This is the foremost embedded event in the Scandinavian region and I have visited and presented there numerous times. This year I have the privilege of being invited to present 4 papers … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , ,

29 February, 2016

My latest article in embedded.com is the first instalment of a two-part piece:

Self-testing in embedded systems

All electronic systems carry the possibility of failure. An embedded system has intrinsic intelligence that facilitates the possibility of predicting failure and mitigating its effects. This article reviews the options for self-testing that are open to the embedded software developer, along with testing algorithms for memory and some ideas for self-monitoring software in multi-tasking and multi-CPU systems.

This first part concentrates on dealing with hardware failure. The second part, which addresses software failure, will be published soon.

, , ,

2 March, 2015

Each Fall, just before the weather becomes too horrible, I get to attend ECS [Embedded Conference Scandinavia] in Stockholm, Sweden. It has become a good event for embedded developers in that area and I am pleased that my paper submissions seem to result in a couple of acceptances each year.

This year, I assume ECS will be in 6 months or so, but the organizers are inaugurating a new event … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , ,

16 February, 2015

The largest event in the world of embedded systems takes place in Nuremberg, Germany on Tuesday-Thursday next week. Embedded World is an annual trade show with a highly-regarded technical conference. This is an annual pilgrimage for me, as I generally have papers in the conference. This year is no exception … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , ,

3 November, 2014

The Fall is a big time for conferences and this week will see me clocking up some more air miles as I visit two events in Europe.

The first conference is in Stockholm, Sweden – Embedded Conference Scandinavia [ECS]. I attended this lively event last year and on several previous occasions. This year, I have two presentations, both on Tuesday:

At 10:00: Self-testing in Embedded Systems

At 14:00: Dynamic Memory Allocation & Fragmentation in C & C++

These are both technical sessions of 30 minutes duration.

On Thursday, I will be at IP-SOC in Grenoble, France. As has become something of a tradition, I will lead the embedded software track with a keynote:

At 09:00: IoT and Embedded Software: No Change or All Change?

If you are attending either of these events, please stop by and say hello. If you would like a copy of any of my slides, please drop me an email.

, , , , , , , ,

18 November, 2013

My busy two week conference period is now behind me and, having had a bit of R&R in the meantime, I have had a chance to reflect on some of my experiences and impressions of the three events: ARM TechCon, ECS and IP-SoC.

If you attended any of these events, please email or comment to share your thoughts. If you would like copies of any of my materials, please emailRead the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

14 October, 2013

Stuff goes wrong – it is a fact of life. Embedded devices are typically very reliable, but not immune to failure. A common failure mode is a lock-up – the device freezes and will not respond to any user interaction. This could be caused by either a software or a hardware problem. In any case, I recently wrote about how a device can perform a self test and how software can preempt its own failure.

But freezes happen, and what do you do? … Read the rest of this entry »

, , ,

2 September, 2013

, , , , ,

27 August, 2013

Things go wrong. Electronic components die. Systems fail. This is almost inevitable and, the more complex that systems become, the more likely it is that failure will occur. In complex systems, however, that failure might be subtle; simple systems tend to just work or not work.

As an embedded system is “smart”, it seems only reasonable that this intelligence can be directed at identifying and mitigating the effects of failure … Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

@colin_walls tweets

  • My latest video blog is now available. I talk about the use of a memory management unit [MMU] in an embedded system https://t.co/aSVECLARgl
  • Embedded software article: RTOS Revealed #6 look at the additional facilities that and RTOS may offer & beyond https://t.co/GXg8ivM3gW
  • #programmingTip To maintain real time integrity, keep ISRs as short as possible - unload the real work onto a task.

Follow colin_walls