Posts Tagged ‘non-volatile memory’

9 January, 2017

My latest video blog is now available. I am talking about memory architectures in embedded systems. Not strictly a software issue, but a topic that has a significant impact on embedded software development. You can see the video here or here:

Future video blogs will continue to look at topics of interest to embedded software developers. Suggestions for topics are always welcome via comment, email or social networking.

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12 August, 2013

It can be frustrating waiting for a critical technology to be ready for market. We see ever increasing power and complexity in embedded CPUs, but other vital system components seem to have stalled. Specifically, I am thinking about batteries and memory.

I am still waiting for a great leap in battery performance – faster charging and larger capacity. My money is on graphene super-capacitors being the way forward. With memory, help may be at hand … Read the rest of this entry »

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16 May, 2011

People often ask me questions about embedded software. Sometimes they are complex; other times they are simple. But frequently, the simplest ones are what leads to an interesting train of thought. The one that set my brain working recently was something like this: “I have some non-volatile memory in my design, which is used to retain specific parameters through power cycling. The first time the device is used, the memory contains garbage and needs to be initialized. When the software starts up, how can I detect that this is the first time it has run and an initialization sequence needs to be run?”

My first thought was to suggest that simple inspection of the data would show whether it was valid or not. In some applications, that would certainly be true. In others, perfectly valid data could look like a jumble of ones and zeros. There must a be simple, reliable way to make it clear that the memory/data has been initialized … Read the rest of this entry »

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