Posts Tagged ‘dynamic memory’

6 March, 2017

Next week, Tuesday-Thursday 14-16 March is Embedded World in Nuremberg, Germany. This is the biggest event in the world of embedded systems. I have been to the show and conference most years over the last decade and this year is no exception. The event is a very large trade show, along with a technical conference. It is the conference where I usually find myself most occupied … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , ,

28 November, 2016

ESCNext week, the California ESC event takes place and it is back in San Jose this year. I was planning to be there, as I had a paper accepted. Sadly, I needed to cancel my trip and a colleague will present on my behalf. Here are the details of the paper:

Dynamic Memory Allocation & Fragmentation in C & C++

In C and C++, it can be very convenient to allocate and de-allocate blocks of memory as and when needed. This is certainly standard practice in both languages and almost unavoidable in C++. However, the handling of such dynamic memory can be problematic and inefficient. For desktop applications, where memory is freely available, these difficulties can be ignored. For embedded – generally real time – applications, ignoring the issues is not an option.
Dynamic memory allocation tends to be non-deterministic; the time taken to allocate memory may not be predictable and the memory pool may become fragmented, resulting in unexpected allocation failures. In this session the problems will be outlined in detail and an approach to deterministic dynamic memory allocation detailed.

I am sad to be missing the show, but I hope it goes well. If you would like a copy of my presentation, please contact me via email or social media.

, , ,

21 November, 2016

banner_referent_2016The embedded conference season continues and, next week, I will be in Sindelfingen, near Stuttgart in Germany for the ESE Kongress. This is an annual event that I have attended several times over the last few years. There is a small trade show – where some of my colleagues will be manning a stand throughout the week – and multiple streams of presentations … Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

6 July, 2015

A topic that I find particularly interesting, which is raised by many embedded software developers whom I meet, is dynamic memory allocation – grabbing chunks of memory as and when you need them. This seemingly simple and routine operation opens up a huge number of problems. These are not confined to embedded development – many desktop applications exhibit memory leaks that impact performance and can make system reboots common.

However, I am concerned about the embedded development context … Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

27 April, 2015

The first Embedded Systems Conference [ESC] took place in San Jose back in the early 1990s [if I recall correctly]. The annual conference quickly became the key event for learning about embedded systems and spawned other, similar events at various other US locations and abroad. In recent years, there have been changes of ownership and lots of rebranding – every year the conference seemed to have a new name!

But, in 2015, it is time to return to terminology we all recognize and there are a number of ESC events scheduled. The first is next week in Boston, MA … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , ,

3 November, 2014

The Fall is a big time for conferences and this week will see me clocking up some more air miles as I visit two events in Europe.

The first conference is in Stockholm, Sweden – Embedded Conference Scandinavia [ECS]. I attended this lively event last year and on several previous occasions. This year, I have two presentations, both on Tuesday:

At 10:00: Self-testing in Embedded Systems

At 14:00: Dynamic Memory Allocation & Fragmentation in C & C++

These are both technical sessions of 30 minutes duration.

On Thursday, I will be at IP-SOC in Grenoble, France. As has become something of a tradition, I will lead the embedded software track with a keynote:

At 09:00: IoT and Embedded Software: No Change or All Change?

If you are attending either of these events, please stop by and say hello. If you would like a copy of any of my slides, please drop me an email.

, , , , , , , ,

8 September, 2014

In a recent post I mentioned that I have written a lot of articles over the years. I sometimes wonder how many, but it is certainly in the hundreds. Although historically they were in print, nowadays, most of my work appears online. A particular favorite outlet is a popular venue for embedded developers: embedded.com

I have cataloged and highlighted some more of my work … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , ,

1 September, 2014

As I mentioned on a previous occasion, I always welcome questions whenever I make a presentation, do a web seminar, write an article or blog post or whatever. Even very simple queries give me ideas for topics to discuss. I always take the view that, if one engineer poses a question, there are probably a bunch of guys who would also like the answer.

Once again, I am turning my attention to C++ … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , ,

27 May, 2014

Last week I conducted a series of 5 online lectures about C++ for embedded applications. [You can still access the materials and recordings from this site.] As with any such activity, although I hope that I am imparting information and advice, I also expect to get questions and ideas back. I was not disappointed. There were many smart questions that made me think [= good!]. There were no dumb questions that I know of, as the only dumb question is the one that you fail to ask.

It got particularly interesting when C++ constructors and destructors get mixed up with pointers … Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

6 May, 2014

C++ has been on my mind lately. There are many reasons why embedded developers are wary – possibly even afraid – of C++. These include code bloat, execution performance and unreliability resulting from dynamic memory allocation. They are all issues with which engineers should concern themselves, however, none of them are intrinsic problems with the C++ language, as they can all be controlled and contained.

The last on this list of concerns – dynamic memory allocation – I find particularly interesting … Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

25 October, 2010

Last week, I attended the Embedded Conference Scandinavia in Stockholm. This event has been running for a few years now and I have been to it before. It seems to be gaining momentum. The show floor was well filled and there seemed to be a good flow of visitors. My colleagues, who were manning the booth, commented that they had had some good leads.

But I think that it is the technical conference sessions that really keep events like this on the map … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , ,

1 June, 2010

In English, the word “static” has a variety of meanings, but they can be summed up by the definition of the adjective: “pertaining to or characterized by a fixed or stationary condition”. In the software world, it generally refers to things that do not change over time. In both cases, the opposite may be “dynamic”.

In C and C++, the keyword static is inspired by the broader meaning of the word, but has two, separate uses. In C++, there is even a third use of the keyword. The nuances of these meanings/uses are not always well understood … Read the rest of this entry »

, , ,

8 March, 2010

EW 2010

Posted by

Last week I went to Nuremberg [or Nürnberg if you prefer] to attend Embedded World 2010. I have been to this show most years over the last decade or so and it just seems to get bigger and busier each year. This year there were more than 700 exhibitors and in excess of 18,000 visitors. It is now definitely the biggest show/conference for embedded developers anywhere in the world. The electronic displays Conference was co-located; this seems like a reasonable synergy.

I had a number of specific reasons for being at the event, which turned out to be even more interesting than expected … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , ,

7 December, 2009

Last week I attended a conference in Grenoble, France. For some years there has been an annual event focussed on intellectual property [IP] and the broad area hardware design reusability. This year it was extended to encompass embedded systems as well – the last of the three days was largely dedicated to this topic. I submitted some proposals for papers and two were accepted. Hence my attendance. A colleague of mine was also due to attend in order to present a keynote and another technical paper. However, he was required to travel to the US last week, so I took his place. I figured that I would have a busy day on Thursday. The event was interesting and made me think about what conferences are all about and what people expect from them … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , ,

12 October, 2009

Two weeks ago, I posted a blog about heap contiguity, where I proposed an idea for using an MMU to solve fragmentation problems, which I had previously discussed in a Web seminar. I have worked in the embedded software business for many years and have met and worked with a lot of fine people. It seems that quite a few of the read this blog, which is great.

Two of them contacted me by email following that posting … Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , ,

28 September, 2009

A while ago I did a Webinar looking at C++ for embedded applications. It was well attended and well received and there were lots of questions and comments, which is always very satisfying. I observed that a number of people were specifically interested in dynamic memory allocation in C and C++ and the challenges that are presented to embedded and real time programmers. So I developed a further Webinar specifically looking at dynamic memory allocation and fragmentation. Both of these were recorded and available as archives to view on demand.

I was interested in investigating how to avoid dynamic memory [heap] fragmentation …

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , ,

@colin_walls tweets

  • My latest video blog is now available. I talk about the use of a memory management unit [MMU] in an embedded system https://t.co/aSVECLARgl
  • Embedded software article: RTOS Revealed #6 look at the additional facilities that and RTOS may offer & beyond https://t.co/GXg8ivM3gW
  • #programmingTip To maintain real time integrity, keep ISRs as short as possible - unload the real work onto a task.

Follow colin_walls