Posts Tagged ‘UVM’

21 May, 2015

Still having fun doing UVM and Class based debug?

Maybe a debug contest will help. I had a contest with a user not too long ago.

We’ll call him Bob. Bob debugged his UVM testbench using that favorite technique – “logfile” debug. He spent a lot of time inserting, moving and removing $display statements, all while re-running simulation over and over. He’d generate a logfile, analyze it (read: run or tuneup a Perl script) and cross-check with waveforms and source code. He’d get close, only to realize he needed more $display. More Simulation.

Hopefully, just one more $display in one more file… More simulation… Repeat…

He wanted to know if there was a better way to climb around through his UVM Testbench.

Blog 2.3 - UVM Debug - Agent UVM Netlist
<UVM Agent Schematic – One way to climb around>

A Better Way to debug Bob’s Testbench – The Contest!

Bob challenged me to a contest. He wanted to know how fast we could find the bug using Mentor’s Visualizer™ Debug Environment and a post simulation database. One simulation. One shot.

We ran Bob’s simulation, capturing the waveform database. Generating that database required two extra switches:

vopt -debug +designfile …
vsim -qwavedb=+signal+class …

Then we ran the debugger in post-simulation mode:

visualizer +designfile +wavefile

When Bob first saw his RTL signals AND his UVM Class based testbench in the waveform window together, he got a big smile – literally getting up out of his seat.

Our contest was this. Who would be fastest to find the bug? Logfile debug or class based debug? This contest was all hindsight. Bob had already figured out what the bug was and had fixed it before we ever met. In the end the bug was a simple coding mistake in the way that a SystemVerilog queue was being used. Just a simple coding error. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Digging through the testbench

We setup a remote link so that we both could see the post simulation debug session. Bob provided clues about the design and I drove the debugger.

We chased class handles around his design, from driver, across to monitor and into the scoreboard where the problem existed. There was a failure where a transaction contained N sub-transactions. The last two sub-transactions had errors, but only for a certain kind of transaction. And the error happened very late in an otherwise fully functional simulation.

Blog 2.1 - UVM Debug - Driver Transactions - Sequence Parent
<A UVM Driver transaction with derived classes and the parent sequence>

We started at the driver that was driving that transaction. We looked at the sequence_item that the driver received. But we had no idea from looking at the driver source code, what the ACTUAL type of the sequence_item was. Some derived type sequence_item was coming through. We also had no idea which sequence was generating this transaction. There were many sequences running on this driver.

Blog 2.2 - UVM Debug - Class Inheritance

<UVM Class Inheritance Diagram>

We used the waveform and the class inheritance diagram to figure out which class we needed to look at. Really easy. Just put the driver in the waveform and expand the transaction ‘t’ to see the derived type and the parent sequence.

Blog 2.4 - UVM Debug - Actual Sequence Item Type

<The transaction ‘t’ contains a class of type “sequence_item_A_fa”>

Blog 2.4 - UVM Debug - Actual Sequence Type
<The parent sequence is of type “sequence_A”>

Tic – Toc

In about 60 minutes we were at the point of the bug. Bob had spent about 2 weeks getting to this point using his logfiles. Winner!

In our 60 minutes, we saw that a derived class was coming into the driver. We traced the inheritance of that class to find a base class which implemented the SystemVerilog queue processing. That code was the place where the error was. After inspecting the loop control we found and fixed the error.

Coffee break time.

Still having fun.

Testbenches are complex pieces of software. Logfiles are very important debug tools, but with debug tools like Visualizer, post simulation testbench debug can be more than just examining predetermined print statements. You can actually explore the UVM data structure and class based testbench. And you won’t need weeks to do it.

Come to the Verification Academy Booth at DAC in San Francisco June 8, 9 and 10 to hear more about UVM Debug and talk in person about your UVM Debug problems. See you then!

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16 May, 2015

In a recent post on deepchip.com John Cooley wrote about “Who Knew VIP?”. In addition, Mark Olen wrote about this same topic on the verification horizon’s blog. So are VIPs becoming more and more popular? Yes!

Here are the big reasons why I believe we are seeing this trend:

  • Ease of Integration
  • Ready made Configurations and Sequences
  • Debug Capabilities

I will be digging deeper on each of these reasons and topics in a three part series on the Verification Horizons BLOG. Today, in part 1 our focus is Easy Integration or EZ VIP.

While developing VIP’s there are various trade off that one has to consider – ease of use vs amount of configuration, protocol specific vs commonality across various protocols. A couple of years ago; when I first got my hands on Mentor’s VIP, there were some features that I really liked and some that I wasn’t familiar with and some that I needed to learn. Over the last couple of years, there have been strides of improvements with ease of use (EZ-VIP) a big one in that list.

EZ-VIP’s is aimed to make it easier to:

  • Make connections between QVIP interfaces and DUT signals
  • Integrate and configure a QVIP in a UVM testbench

EZ-VIP_Productivity

This makes it easier for customers to become productive in hours rather than days.

Connectivity Modules:

Earlier we gave the users the flexibility on the direction of the ports of VIP based on the use modes. The user needed to write certain glue logic apart from setting the directions of the ports.

QVIP_ConnModule

Now we have created new connectivity modules. These connectivity modules enable easy connectivity during integration. These connectivity modules are wrapper around the VIP interface with the needed glue logic, ports having protocol standard names and with the right direction based on the mode e.g. Master, Slave, EP, RC etc. These now enables the user to quickly integrate the QVIP with the DUT.

EZ-VIP_Productivity_1

Quick Starter Kits:

These kits are specific to PCIe and are customized pre-packaged for all major IP vendors, easy-to-use verification environments for the serial and parallel interfaces of PCIe 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and mPCIe, which can be used to verify PHY, Root Complex and Endpoint designs. Users also get example which could be used as reference. These have dramatically reduced bring up time for PCIe QVIP with these IPs to less than a day.

In the part 2 of this series, I will talk about QVIP Configuration and Sequences. Stay tuned and I look forward to hearing your feedback on the series of posts on VIP.

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17 March, 2015

StPatricksDay

With a name like “Fitzpatrick,” you knew I’d be celebrating today, right?

Well, there’s no better way to celebrate this fine day than to announce that our latest edition of Verification Horizons is available online! Now that Spring is almost here, there’s a bit less snow on the ground than there was when I wrote my introduction, but everything is still covered. I’m considering spray-painting it all green in honor of the occasion, so at least it looks like I have a lawn again.

In this issue of Verification Horizons, I’d particularly like to draw your attention to “Successive Refinement: A Methodology for Incremental Specification of Power Intent,” by my friend and colleague Erich Marschner and several of our friends at ARM® Ltd. In this article, you’ll find out how the Unified Power Format (UPF) specification can be used to specify and verify your power architecture abstractly, and then add implementation information later in the process. This methodology is still relatively new in the industry, so if you’re thinking about making your next design PowerAware, you’ll want to read this article to be up on the very latest approach.

In addition to that, we’ve also got Harry Foster discussing some of the results from his latest industry study in “Does Design Size Influence First Silicon Success?” Harry is also blogging about his survey results on Verification Horizons here and here (with more to come).

Our friends at L&T Technology Services Ltd. share some of their experience in doing PowerAware design in “PowerAware RTL Verification of USB 3.0 IPs,” in which you’ll see how UPF can let you explore two different power management architectures for the same RTL.

Next, History class is in session, with Dr. Lauro Rizzatti, long-time EDA guru, giving us part 1 of a 3-part lesson in “Hardware Emulation: Three Decades of Evolution.”

Our friends at Oracle® are up next with “Evolving the Use of Formal Model Checking in SoC Design Verification,” in which they share a case study of their use of formal methods as the central piece in verifying an SoC design they recently completed with first-pass silicon success. By the way, I’d also like to take this opportunity to congratulate the author of this article, Ram Narayan, for his Best Paper award at DVCon(US) 2015. Well done, Ram!

We round out the issue with our famous “Partners’ Corner” section, which includes two articles. In “Small, Maintainable Tests,” our friends at Sondrel IC Design Services show you a few tricks on how to make use of UVM virtual sequences to raise the level of abstraction of your tests. In “Functional Coverage Development Tips: Do’s and Don’ts,” our friends at eInfochips give you a great overview of functional coverage, especially the covergroup and related features in SystemVerilog.

I’d also like to take a moment to thank all of you who came by our Verification Academy booth at DVCon to say hi. I found it incredibly humbling and gratifying to hear from so many of you who have learned new verification skills from the Verification Academy. That’s a big part of why we do what we do, and I appreciate you letting us know about it.

Now, it’s time to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day for real!

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11 February, 2015

Accellera Approves Creation of Portable Stimulus Working Group

At DVCon 2014, Mentor Graphics proposed Accellera launch an exploratory exercise, called a Proposed Working Group (PWG), to determine if there was sufficient interest and need to create a standard in this area.  To help motivate the consideration of this activity, we indicated we would offer our graph-based test specification embodied in our inFact verification tool.

Rapid adoption of our technology has been the trend, especially when used in conjunction within a SystemVerilog UVM testbench environment.  One of the major benefits of UVM has been the portable nature of the testbench to facilitate design verification within and across companies.  The exclusive nature of our graph-based test specification language limits its easy use within the industry leading users to suggest we look to standardize it in keeping with the fundamental UVM principle of testbench portability.

After about a year of discussion in Accellera, the group announced it had concluded there should be an official standards project in this area.  Industry participants have likewise offered quotes of support for the formation of the Accellera Portable Stimulus Working Group.

The challenges to efficient and effective verification continue to grow.  If we stop where we are today in verification algorithm advances and standards the trend to require more people, time or compute resources will continue grow unabated at exponential rates.

For Mentor Graphics part, the verification team here has gone to market with innovative technology that has shown remarkable ability to improve verification productivity and efficiency.  The specification we offer to Accellera to seed this project is the same embodied in technology we used when we partnered with TSMC to validate advanced functional verification technology we announced in 2011.  From that announcement, we shared that tests conducted by AppliedMicro in designs destined for TSMC shortened “time-to-coverage by over 100x.”

One need not wonder if it is possible to shrink a month’s worth of verification tests into less than an 8 hour work day.  It is.  To find out how our specific use of this technology works and what motivates us to support standardization of Portable Stimulus in Accellera, I invite you to visit the Verification Academy where a session on Intelligent Testbench Automation shows what can be done.

And for those who would like to help in the development of the standard and may have technology to further underpin it, you should consider attending the first organizational meeting of the Portable Stimulus Working Group at DVCon 2015 March 5th from 6pm-9pm.  Contact Accellera for member-only meeting details or catch me at DVCon 2015 and I can share more information with you.

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14 January, 2015

“Who Knew?” about verification IP (VIP), was the theme of a recent DeepChip post by John Cooley on December 18.  More specifically the article states, “Who knew VIP was big and that Wally had a good piece of it?”  We knew.

We knew that ASIC and FPGA design engineers can choose to buy design IP from several alternative sources or build their own, but that does not help with the problem of verification.  We knew that you don’t really want to rely on the same source that designed your IP, to test it.  We knew that you don’t want to write and maintain bus functional models (BFMs) or more complete VIP for standard protocols.  Not that you couldn’t, but why would you if you don’t have to?

We also knew that verification teams want easy-to-use VIP that is built on a standard foundation of SystemVerilog, compliant with a protocol’s specification, and is easily configurable to your implementation.  That way it integrates into your verification environment just as easily as if you had built it yourself.

Leading design IP providers such as ARM®, PLDA, and Northwest Logic knew that Mentor Graphics’ VIP is built on standards, is protocol compliant, and is easy to use.  In fact you can read more about what Jim Wallace, systems and software group director at ARM; Stephane Hauradou, CTO of PLDA; and Brian Daellenbach, president of Northwest Logic; have to say about Mentor Graphics’ recently introduced EZ-VIP technology for PCIe 4.0 (at this website http://www.mentor.com/company/news/mentor-verification-ip-pcie-4 ), and why they know that their customers can rely on it as well.

Verification engineers knew, too.  You can read comments from many of them (at Cooley’s website http://www.deepchip.com/items/dac14-06.html ), about their opinions on VIP.  In addition, Mercury Systems also knew.  “Mentor Graphics PCIe VIP is fully compliant with the PCIe protocol specification and with UVM coding guidelines. We found that we could drop it into our existing environment and get it up and running very quickly”, said Nick Solimini, Consulting DV Engineer at Mercury Systems. “Mentor’s support for their VIP is excellent. All our technical questions were answered promptly so we were able to be productive throughout the project”.

So, now you know,  Mentor Graphics’ Questa VIP is built on standard SV UVM, is specification compliant, is easy to get up and running and is an integral part of many successful verification environments today.  If you’d like to learn more about Questa VIP and Mentor Graphics’ EZ-VIP technology, send me an email, and I’ll let you in on what (thanks to Cooley and our customers) is no longer the best kept secret in verification.  Who knew?

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5 November, 2014

Between 2006 and 2014, the average number of IPs integrated into an advanced SoC increased from about 30 to over 120. In the same period, the average number of embedded processors found in an advanced SoC increased from one to as many as 20. However, increased design size is only one dimension of the growing verification complexity challenge. Beyond this growing-functionality phenomenon are new layers of requirements that must be verified. Many of these verification requirements did not exist ten years ago, such as multiple asynchronous clock domains, interacting power domains, security domains, and complex HW/SW dependencies. Add all these challenges together, and you have the perfect storm brewing.

It’s not just the challenges in design and verification that have been changing, of course. New technologies have been developed to address emerging verification challenges. For example, new automated ways of applying formal verification have been developed that allow non-Formal experts to take advantage of the significant benefits of formal verification. New technology for stimulus generation have also been developed that allow verification engineers to develop complex stimulus scenarios 10x more efficiently than with directed tests and execute those tests 10x more efficiently than with pure-random generation.

It’s not just technology, of course. Along with new technologies, new methodologies are needed to make adoption of new technologies efficient and repeatable. The UVM is one example of these new methodologies that make it easier to build complex and modular testbench environments by enabling reuse – both of verification components and knowledge.

The Verification Academy website provides great resources for learning about new technologies and methodologies that make verification more effective and efficient. This year, we tried something new and took Verification Academy on the road with live events in Austin, Santa Clara, and Denver. It was great to see so many verification engineers and managers attending to learn about new verification techniques and share their experiences applying these techniques with their colleagues.

va_live_sc

If you weren’t able to attend one of the live events – or if you did attend and really want to see a particular session again – you’re in luck. The presentations from the Verification Academy Live seminars are now available on the Verification Academy site:

  • Navigating the Perfect Storm: New School Verification Solutions
  • New School Coverage Closure
  • New School Connectivity Checking
  • New School Stimulus Generation Techniques
  • New School Thinking for Fast and Efficient Verification using EZ-VIP
  • Verification and Debug: Old School Meets New School
  • New Low Power Verification Techniques
  • Establishing a company-wide verification reuse library with UVM
  • Full SoC Emulation from Device Drivers to Peripheral Interfaces

You can find all the sessions via the following link:

https://verificationacademy.com/seminars/academy-live

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9 October, 2014

DVCon India, held in September 2014 in Bangalore, built on the Indian SystemC User Group meeting events and added a Design & Verification track to its popular system-level design (ESL) track that has been popular for many years.  The main stage played host to the keynote presentations, opening ceremonies and best paper and poster awards.

Several DVCon India keynote presentations, which I will go into more depth later touched on emerging use of virtual platforms in system design and the growing impact India has on design verification.  In particular, Mentor’s CEO, Wally Rhines contrasted Wilson Research survey data on design verification from India and the rest of the world.  A strong adoption of SystemVerilog and its popular methodology, the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) was clear from the survey results Wally shared.

But even beyond SystemVerilog and UVM, the discuss of what could come next anchored the first day of DVCon India discussion on Accellera’s exploration of “portable stimulus.”  Accellera has a group exploring if the industry is ready to start a standards project on this concept.  And the first day when DVCon India attendees were offered an opportunity to learn about this, the multi-company (Mentor Graphics, Breker & CVC) tutorial on the topic was standing room only.

DVCon Europe – The Stage is Set!

A tutorial slot at DVCon Europe will be devoted to the same topic that was popular at DVCon India.  For DVCon Europe attendees, you will find Tutorial T9, “Creating Portable Tests with a Graph-Based Test Specification” will cover this topic.  Technical representatives from Mentor Graphics and Breker will cover aspects of portable stimulus and offer examples of how it can work.  And early application of the technology will be covered by a representative from IBM.  To cover the topic appropriately, we have modified the presenters listed in the official printed program and full details are available online.  The presenters will be, in this order:

  • Holger Horbach, IBM, Germany
  • Frederic Krampac, Breker, France
  • Staffan Berg, Mentor Graphics, Sweden

Please join us for this tutorial and ensuing conversation and discussion.  Verification productivity is a pressing issue and our ability to better control and create stimulus is a step in the direction to address the verification challenges we all face.

One last note, the concept of “portable stimulus” is language agnostic so no matter which language you use for design and verification, the intention is this technology will be able to help.   The tutorial will help you understand how using a graph-based approach enables the highest degree of verification re-use, from IP block to sub-system to full-system level verification. You will see how it supports verification in SystemVerilog, Verilog, VHDL, C, C/C++, assembly, and even other non-traditional base languages. And it also can be extended from simulation to emulation to FPGA prototyping, and even silicon validation.

I look forward to seeing you at DVCon Europe in Munich!  And if you have not yet registered, please do so to secure your seat.

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9 July, 2014

Accellera has announced the completion of a multi-year effort to update its latest edition of the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM).  In completing this effort, the UVM 1.2 Class Reference Document was approved as an Accellera standard and the UVM Working Group has supplied an accompanying open-source reference implementation.  Questa supports UVM 1.2.

In addition to the resources you can download from Accellera, additional information on UVM 1.2 can be found at the Verification AcademyHTML documentation can easily be found at the Verification Academy too.

If you are a user of UVM 1.1 and have not been part of the UVM 1.2 development effort, you should know your peers have been busy the past few years since the stabilization and completion of UVM 1.1 to drive global adoption of UVM and to add, enhance and extend UVM.  In UVM 1.2 Messaging is now object-oriented, Sequences can automatically raise and drop objects, the register layer can now control transaction order within bursts and numerous bugs in UVM 1.1 have been fixed to improve quality.

Backward Incompatibility

All these changes come with a cost to the current UVM 1.1 user community.  When Accellera announced UVM 1.2 availability, it also disclosed some of the new features introduce backward incompatibility.  To reduce those issues, Accellera is making release notes and a one way conversion script part of the UVM 1.2 kit to ease the migration path forward.

If you follow the Verification Academy Cookbook rules, you will probably not see any impact from the backward compatibility issues.  And if you control your total verification environment, you will probably find it simpler to migrate forward as well.  Those who depend on outside resources will need to make sure those resources (like Verification IP) migrate forward to UVM 1.2 so you can migrate forward to UVM 1.2.  Mixing UVM 1.1 and UVM 1.2 was not considered by the Accellera UVM Working Group and is fraught with unknown issues.  We consider the migration an all or nothing proposition.  If you have multi-division, multi-company projects underway, it would be prudent to plan you move to UVM 1.2 with care at the conclusion of projects and when all suppliers and participating teams can migrate to UVM 1.2.

Public Review Period

Accellera seeks your input and feedback on UVM 1.2.  To support this, a public review forum on the Accellera website has been established to allow users to catalog issues, ask questions and generally offer feedback to help improve UVM 1.2 quality.

The public review process will end on October 1, 2014.  We encourage users to take the time now to test UVM 1.2 in their own environments and share their feedback to expidite the migration to UVM 1.2.

Path to IEEE

Public feedback will be taken into account along with further Accellera member testing to update UVM 1.2 prior to a committed hand-off to the IEEE for further standardization there later this year.  As this path unfolds, I will share updates on the standardization effort in the IEEE.

Verification Academy DAC 2014 UVM 1.2 Presentation

You will find many resources around the world on UVM 1.2.  At DAC 2014, the Verification Academy booth sponsored a session on UVM 1.2 titled  “UVM: What’s New, What’s Next, and Why You Care.”  If you did not attend DAC, you can still download the presentation and watch a video replay of it if you are a Verification Academy “full access” member (free registration required; restrictions apply).

The presentation by Tom Fitzpatrick goes into detail on the UVM 1.2 topic.  Importantly in Tom’s presentation is a discussion about what you should care about today.  You may find that software is a big issue and that his thesis challenges one to ask if UVM 1.2 is stuck in the past rather than addressing what should be addressed next.  I invite you to download the presentation and watch the video and share with me your thoughts. What do you think?

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25 April, 2014

DVCon 2014 Conference Proceedings Published

2014DVCon_logoWith record attendance announced for DVCon 2014, one might wonder if there is really a need to put some of the “Accellera Day” tutorial videos online.  With more than 1,000 professionals attending in some capacity, it would be easy to conclude that everyone that needs to know about UVM and the developments on the updated version to it, probably know.  Looking at just the LinkedIn design and verification forums one will realize there are 10’s of thousands who would have benefited if they had attended DVCon.  Thus, sharing this information more broadly is in order.

UVM Tutorial Video

UVM – What’s Now and What’s Next” is the tittle of the DVCon 2014 tutorial on UVM.  It covered use cases and pragmatic topics of the current UVM 1.1 standard as well as advanced topics for the next update, UVM 1.2.  The presenters covered sequence creation, register layer use, TLM-based communication, test execution, run-time phases and messaging enhancements.

The tutorial was split into five separate sections delivered by five speakers as follows:

  • Working Group Update: Adam Sherer, Accellera (7 min.)
  • Overview and Library Concepts: John Aynsley, Doulos (36 min.)
  • Stimulus Generation: Shawn Honess, Synopsys (21 min.)
  • UVM Register Layer: Tom Fitzpatrick, Mentor Graphics (36 min.)
  • UVM 1.2 Introduction: Uwe Simm, Cadence Design Systems (25 min.)

You can find out more information about the online tutorial videos hereRegistration is required, but there is no charge for access.  Once you have registered, you will get links to each of the five sections.  You can stream them or download them for offline access as you wish.  They are suitable for viewing on your computer or mobile devices.

DVCon 2014 Proceedings

DVCon 2014 was a full conference; it was more than just the the Accellera Day UVM Tutorial.  And in keeping with DVCon tradition, the conference proceedings are made available to all several months after the conference without charge.  If you visit the DVCon history area, you will find the 2014 proceedings have been published.  What I like about the DVCon proceedings it not only are the papers published, but the slides that were presented at the conference will often accompany the paper.

As an example, if you were interested in the DVCon 2014 Best Oral Presentation paper and presentation (Kelly D. Larson from NVIDIA on , “Determining Test Quality through Dynamic Runtime Monitoring of SystemVerilog Assertions” by the way), you will now find both the paper and presentation available online here.

For all those who did not make it to DVCon 2014, or who were there and could not see everything, the proceedings are now online and the first of the Accellera Day tutorials videos is published. Accellera is busy readying its other tutorial videos.  I’ll share information on their availability as they appear in the weeks and months ahead.

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10 April, 2014

Its always fun to take the wraps off of solutions we have been hard at work developing.  The global team of Mentor Graphics engineers have spent considerable time and energy to bring the next level of SoC design and verification productivity to what seems to be a never ending response to Moore’s Law.  As silicon feature sizes get smaller, design sizes get larger and the verification problem mushrooms.  But you know that.  These changes are the constants that drive the need for continued innovation.  Our next level of innovation for design verification is embodied in the Mentor Enterprise Verification Platform (EVP) which we recently announced.

Gary Smith recently published Keeping Up with the Emulation Market, and lays out the fact that verification platforms are unifying with emulation now a pivotal element, not just for microprocessor design success, but for Multi-Platform Based SoC design success as well.  The need to bring software debug into the loop with early hardware concepts is a verification challenge that must be supported as well.  Pradeep Chakraborty reported on the point made by Anil Gupta of Applied Micro at the UVM 1.2 Day in Bangalore where Anil implored “Think about the block, the subsystem and the top.”  The point made was software is often overlooked or under tested prior to committing to hardware implementation implying that our focus on UVM leaves us to verify no higher than where UVM takes us – and that is not the “top” of the SoC that mandates software be part of the verification plan.

Path to Success

With the Mentor EVP, we do address these issues.  We bring simulation and emulation together in a unified platform.  Software debug on conceptual hardware is supported to address verification at the “top.”  And even as Gary’s report concludes with a wonder about how easy access to emulation will be supported for the masses.  That too is solved in the Mentor EVP using VirtuaLAB that can be hosted in data centers along with the emulator vs. complex, one-off lab setups that lock an emulator to a design and lock out your global team of software developers from collaborating.  The Mentor EVP moves to emulation for the masses in a 24×7 world.

With big designs comes big data and complex debug tasks.  These complex debug tasks are all easily handled by the new Mentor Visualizer Debug Environment that has native UVM and SystemVerilog class-based debug capabilities and low-power UPF debug support to easily pinpoint design errors. All of this works in both interactive and post-simulation modes for simulation and emulation.  To keep the software team productive, and get to SoC signoff sooner, the innovative and new Veloce OS3 global emulation resourcing technology moves software debug think-time offline to Mentor’s Codelink software debug tool.

And there’s more!  But I’ll leave that for you to discover.  When you have time, visit us here, to learn more about the Mentor Enterprise Verification Platform.

Path to Standards

As the move to support Multi-Platform Based SoC evolves, so do the standards that underpin it.  And as I’ve reported on the comments of others in this blog – and the understanding from our experience that UVM can only go so far in Multi-Platform Based SoC verification – we concluded the time is right for the industry to explore the need for new standards.

We announced at DVCon 2014 an offer to take our graph-based test specification into an Accellera committee to help move beyond the limitations today’s standards have.  As our investment in tools, technology and platforms continues, we are keenly aware users want their design and verification data to be as portable as possible.  The Accellera user community members echoed the need to discuss portable stimulus that can take you up and down the design hierarchy from block, to subsystem, to system (“top”) and support the concurrent design of hardware and software.

In support of this, Accellera approved the formation of a Portable Stimulus Specification Proposed Working Group (PWG) to study the validity and need for a portable stimulus specification.  To that end, join me at the kickoff meeting to launch this activity on Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 10:00am to 4:00pm Pacific time at the offices of Mentor Graphics in Fremont, CA USA.  If you would to attend, or you would  like time on the agenda to discuss technology that would advance the development of a Portable Stimulus Specification or discuss your objectives/requirements for this group, contact me and I will put you in touch with the meeting organizer.  Accellera PWG meetings are open to all and do not require Accellera membership status to attend.

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