Posts Tagged ‘UVM’

25 August, 2015

I have always been wanting to contribute to the growing verification engineering community in India, which Mentor’s CEO Wally Rhines calls “the largest verification market in the world”. So when I first accompanied the affable Dennis Brophy to the IEEE India office back in April of 2014 to discuss the possibility of having a DVCon in India, I knew I was at the right place at the right time and it was opportunity to contribute to this community.

I has been two years since that meeting, I don’t have to write about how big a success the first ever DVCon India in 2014 was. I’m glad I played a small part by being on the Technical Program Committee on the DV track, reviewing various abstracts. It is a responsibility which I thoroughly enjoyed. This year in addition to being on the TPC, I am contributing as the Chair for Tutorials and Posters. I am eagerly looking forward to the second edition of the Verification Extravaganza which is on 10th and 11th Sept 2015 and the amazing agenda we have planned for attendees.

Day 1 of the conference is dedicated to keynotes, panel discussions and tutorials while day 2 is dedicated fully to Papers with a DV track and a panel in addition to papers in a ESL track. Participants are free to attend any track and can move between tracks. This year we had many sponsored tutorials submissions hence, there will be three parallel tutorial tracks, one on the DV side and two on the ESL track.

Below please find a list of those that Mentor Graphics will be presenting at:

  • Keynote from Harry Foster discussing the growing complexity across the entire design ecosystem
    Thursday, September 10, 2015
    9:45am – 10:30am
    Grand Ball Room, The Leela Palace
    More Information >
    Register for this event >
  • Creating SystemVerilog UVM Testbenches for Simulation and Emulation Platform Portability to Boost Block-to-System Verification Productivity
    Thursday, September 10, 2015
    1:30pm – 3:00pm
    DV Track, Diya, The Leela Palace
    More Information >
    Register for this event >
  • Expediting the code coverage closure using Static Formal Techniques – A proven approach at block and SoC Levels!
    Thursday, September 10, 2015
    1:30pm – 3:00pm
    DV Track, Grand Ball Room, The Leela Palace
    More Information >
    Register for this event >

The papers on day 2 are primarily split into 3 parallel tracks, one on DV track and 2 parallel tracks on ESL. Within the DV track, one area is dedicated to UVM/SV. The other categories within the DV track will cover Portable Stimulus & Graph Based Stimulus, AMS, SoC & Stimulus Generation, Emulation, Acceleration and Prototyping & a generic selected category. The surprise among the categories is Portable Stimulus, which was a tutorial in last year however has continued to be of high interest and sessions will build on last year’s initial tutorial.

Overall there is an exciting mix of keynotes, tutorials, panels, papers and posters, which will make two exceptional days of learning, networking and fun. I look forward to seeing at DVCon India, 2015 and if you see me at the show, please come say hello and let me know what you think of the conference.

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30 July, 2015

Accellera Handoffs UVM to IEEE

It has been a long path from Mentor’s AVM to IEEE P1800.2.  But the moment has arrived: Accellera has formally announced UVM 1.2 will be submitted as a contribution to the IEEE P1800.2™ working group.

Verification Methodology Beginnings

As the IEEE finalized approval of the initial release of SystemVerilog (IEEE Std. 1800™) in 2005, I floated the idea of the need for a methodology that would be a companion to it.  At the time there was little to no industry desire to explore this opportunity in earnest – apart from interest by Mentor Graphics – so we launched our Advanced Verification Methodology (AVM) and set a new direction for an open functional verification methodology.  We built implementations of AVM based on SystemVerilog and SystemC (IEEE Std. 1666™).  We also pioneered an open-source mechanism based on the Apache 2.0 license which is now the accepted license to foster global and rapid open-source adoption in the EDA industry.  And as others joined with us in this journey, AVM grew to become OVM, then UVM.  Now UVM is set to become an IEEE standard.  The IEEE has assigned it project number 1800.2.

imagePath to IEEE

To say we are pleased to see UVM move to the IEEE is an understatement.  We congratulate the Accellera UVM team on its accomplishment and look forward to participate in this phase of UVM’s standardization. Since our first public announcement on May 8, 2006 when we introduced the world to AVM and announced support for it from 19 of our Questa Vanguard Partners, to our announced collaboration with Cadence Design Systems on the development of the Open Verification Methodology (OVM) on August 16, 2007 and the eventual announcement January 8, 2010 that Accellera adopts OVM as the basis of its Universal Verification Methodology, we have guided its development and supported a path for the Big-3 EDA to voice positive public support.  We are thrilled Accellera has announced its delivery of UVM to the IEEE for ongoing standardization and maintenance.

IEEE Standardization

What comes next?  The IEEE P1800.2 (UVM) project has announced a Call for Participation and kickoff meeting to be held August 6, 2015 from 9am – 11am PDT.  The first meeting will be held via teleconference.  In order to attend, you will need to register for the meeting.  Membership in the IEEE project will be “entity-based” with one company, one vote.  The call for participation has details on membership requirements in order to observe or actively participate.  The 1800.2 project will only focus on the written specification and not the open-source base class library (BCL).  The Accellera UVM TSC will continue to update the BCL.  Accellera has committed to keep the BCL implementation current with changes proposed and approved by the IEEE 1800.2 working group.  This is just like the arrangement Accellera has with the IEEE for SystemC.

Join us at the upcoming meeting and remember to register in order to attend!

 

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29 July, 2015

VA DAC2015 smlIf you were not one of the 100’s of visitors to the Verification Academy booth at DAC 2015 and missed an opportunity to get a printed copy of the DAC 2015 issue of Verification Horizons, don’t worry.  You can also download it as well.

Questa Vanguard Partners Highlighted

Eight of the eleven articles were authored or co-authored by our partners and represent a wide range of topics.  There are two articles on DO-254 (Partners: eInfochips and Verisense).  There is an article on Formal and ABV of MBIST MCPs (Parnter: FishTail Design Automation).  There is an article on how to start formal analysis “right” (Partner: OSKI).  For UVM users, reuse of MATLAB® functions and Simulink® functions is covered (Partner: Mathworks).  Continuing with another article for the UVM users, intelligent testbench automation with UVM and Questa® is explored (Partner: Codasip Ltd.).  For the Agile community, unit testing your way to a reliable testbench is explored (Partner: XtremeEDA & User company: NVIDIA).  Lastly, a noted emulation consultant (Lauro Rizzatti) shares part 2 of his three decades of emulation evolution and a customer paper (Marvell) covers techniques to accelerate RTL simulation.

VH DAC 2015 CoverAll of this is inside the 60-page mega-issue of Verification Horizons in 11 articles.  Direct links to each of the articles is shared below along with the article titles and authors.  The editor introduction by Tom Fitzpatrick gives even more detail and background on this issue.  If you don’t already have some summer or vacation reading, get your electronic copy today!

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27 July, 2015

ASIC/IC Language and Library Adoption Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here).  In my previous blog (click here), I presented our study findings on various verification technology adoption trends. In this blog, I focus on language and library adoption trends.

As previously noted, the reason some of the results sum to more than 100 percent is that some projects are using multiple languages; thus, individual projects can have multiple answers.

Figure 1 shows the adoption trends for languages used to create RTL designs. Essentially, the adoption rates for all languages used to create RTL designs is projected to be either declining or flat over the next year, with the exception of SystemVerilog.

2014-WRG-BLOG-ASIC-10-1

Figure 1. ASIC/IC Languages Used for RTL Design

Figure 2 shows the adoption trends for languages used to create ASIC/IC testbenches. Essentially, the adoption rates for all languages used to create testbenches are either declining or flat, with the exception of SystemVerilog. Nonetheless, the data suggest that SystemVerilog adoption is starting to saturate or level off at about 75 percent.

2014-WRG-BLOG-ASIC-10-2

Figure 2. ASIC/IC Languages Used for  Verification (Testbenches)

Figure 3 shows the adoption trends for various ASIC/IC testbench methodologies built using class libraries.

2014-WRG-BLOG-ASIC-10-3

Figure 3. ASIC/IC Methodologies and Testbench Base-Class Libraries

Here we see a decline in adoption of all methodologies and class libraries with the exception of Accellera’s UVM3, whose adoption increased by 56 percent between 2012 and 2014. Furthermore, our study revealed that UVM is projected to grow an additional 13 percent within the next year.

Figure 4 shows the ASIC/IC industry adoption trends for various assertion languages, and again, SystemVerilog Assertions seems to have saturated or leveled off.

2014-WRG-BLOG-ASIC-10-4

Figure 4. ASIC/IC Assertion Language Adoption

In my next blog (click here) I plan to present the ASIC/IC design and verification power trends.

Quick links to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Study results

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3 June, 2015

FPGA Language and Library Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs related to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here). In my previous blog (click here), I focused on FPGA verification techniques and technologies adoption trends, as identified by the 2014 Wilson Research Group study. In this blog, I’ll present FPGA design and verification language trends, as identified by the Wilson Research Group study.

You might note that the percentage for some of the language and library data that I present sums to more than one hundred percent. The reason for this is that many FPGA projects today use multiple languages.

FPGA RTL Design Language Adoption Trends

Let’s begin by examining the languages used for FPGA RTL design. Figure 1 shows the trends in terms of languages used for design, by comparing the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in dark blue), the 2014 Wilson Research Group study (in light blue), as well as the projected design language adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple). Note that the language adoption is declining for most of the languages used for FPGA design with the exception of Verilog and SystemVerilog.

Also, it’s important to note that this study focused on languages used for RTL design. We have conducted a few informal studies related to languages used for architectural modeling—and it’s not too big of a surprise that we see increased adoption of C/C++ and SystemC in that space. However, since those studies have (thus far) been informal and not as rigorously executed as the Wilson Research Group study, I have decided to withhold that data until a more formal study can be executed related to architectural modeling and virtual prototyping.

Figure 1. Trends in languages used for FPGA design

It’s not too big of a surprise that VHDL is the predominant language used for FPGA RTL design, although the projected trend is that Verilog will likely overtake VHDL in terms of the predominate language used for FPGA design in the near future.

FPGA Verification Language Adoption Trends

Next, let’s look at the languages used to verify FPGA designs (that is, languages used to create simulation testbenches). Figure 2 shows the trends in terms of languages used to create simulation testbenches by comparing the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in dark blue), the 2014 Wilson Research Group study (in light blue), as well as the projected verification language adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple).

Figure 2. Trends in languages used in verification to create FPGA simulation testbenches

FPGA Testbench Methodology Class Library Adoption Trends

Now let’s look at testbench methodology and class library adoption for FPGA designs. Figure 3 shows the trends in terms of methodology and class library adoption by comparing the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in dark blue), the 2014 Wilson Research Group study (in light blue), as well as the projected verification language adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple).

Figure 3. FPGA methodology and class library adoption trends

Today, we see a downward trend in terms of adoption of all testbench methodologies and class libraries with the exception of UVM, which has increased by 28 percent since 2012. The study participants were also asked what they plan to use within the next 12 months, and based on the responses, UVM is projected to increase an additional 20 percent.

FPGA Assertion Language and Library Adoption Trends

Finally, let’s examine assertion language and library adoption for FPGA designs. The 2014 Wilson Research Group study found that 44 percent of all the FPGA projects have adopted assertion-based verification (ABV) as part of their verification strategy. The data presented in this section shows the assertion language and library adoption trends related to those participants who have adopted ABV.

Figure 4 shows the trends in terms of assertion language and library adoption by comparing the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in dark blue), the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in green), and the projected adoption trends within the next 12 months (in purple). The adoption of SVA continues to increase, while other assertion languages and libraries either remain flat or decline.

Figure 4. Trends in assertion language and library adoption for FPGA designs

In my next blog (click here), I will shift the focus of this series of blogs and start to present the ASIC/IC findings from the 2014 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study.

Quick links to the 2014 Wilson Research Group Study results

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21 May, 2015

Still having fun doing UVM and Class based debug?

Maybe a debug contest will help. I had a contest with a user not too long ago.

We’ll call him Bob. Bob debugged his UVM testbench using that favorite technique – “logfile” debug. He spent a lot of time inserting, moving and removing $display statements, all while re-running simulation over and over. He’d generate a logfile, analyze it (read: run or tuneup a Perl script) and cross-check with waveforms and source code. He’d get close, only to realize he needed more $display. More Simulation.

Hopefully, just one more $display in one more file… More simulation… Repeat…

He wanted to know if there was a better way to climb around through his UVM Testbench.

Blog 2.3 - UVM Debug - Agent UVM Netlist
<UVM Agent Schematic – One way to climb around>

A Better Way to debug Bob’s Testbench – The Contest!

Bob challenged me to a contest. He wanted to know how fast we could find the bug using Mentor’s Visualizer™ Debug Environment and a post simulation database. One simulation. One shot.

We ran Bob’s simulation, capturing the waveform database. Generating that database required two extra switches:

vopt -debug +designfile …
vsim -qwavedb=+signal+class …

Then we ran the debugger in post-simulation mode:

visualizer +designfile +wavefile

When Bob first saw his RTL signals AND his UVM Class based testbench in the waveform window together, he got a big smile – literally getting up out of his seat.

Our contest was this. Who would be fastest to find the bug? Logfile debug or class based debug? This contest was all hindsight. Bob had already figured out what the bug was and had fixed it before we ever met. In the end the bug was a simple coding mistake in the way that a SystemVerilog queue was being used. Just a simple coding error. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

Digging through the testbench

We setup a remote link so that we both could see the post simulation debug session. Bob provided clues about the design and I drove the debugger.

We chased class handles around his design, from driver, across to monitor and into the scoreboard where the problem existed. There was a failure where a transaction contained N sub-transactions. The last two sub-transactions had errors, but only for a certain kind of transaction. And the error happened very late in an otherwise fully functional simulation.

Blog 2.1 - UVM Debug - Driver Transactions - Sequence Parent
<A UVM Driver transaction with derived classes and the parent sequence>

We started at the driver that was driving that transaction. We looked at the sequence_item that the driver received. But we had no idea from looking at the driver source code, what the ACTUAL type of the sequence_item was. Some derived type sequence_item was coming through. We also had no idea which sequence was generating this transaction. There were many sequences running on this driver.

Blog 2.2 - UVM Debug - Class Inheritance

<UVM Class Inheritance Diagram>

We used the waveform and the class inheritance diagram to figure out which class we needed to look at. Really easy. Just put the driver in the waveform and expand the transaction ‘t’ to see the derived type and the parent sequence.

Blog 2.4 - UVM Debug - Actual Sequence Item Type

<The transaction ‘t’ contains a class of type “sequence_item_A_fa”>

Blog 2.4 - UVM Debug - Actual Sequence Type
<The parent sequence is of type “sequence_A”>

Tic – Toc

In about 60 minutes we were at the point of the bug. Bob had spent about 2 weeks getting to this point using his logfiles. Winner!

In our 60 minutes, we saw that a derived class was coming into the driver. We traced the inheritance of that class to find a base class which implemented the SystemVerilog queue processing. That code was the place where the error was. After inspecting the loop control we found and fixed the error.

Coffee break time.

Still having fun.

Testbenches are complex pieces of software. Logfiles are very important debug tools, but with debug tools like Visualizer, post simulation testbench debug can be more than just examining predetermined print statements. You can actually explore the UVM data structure and class based testbench. And you won’t need weeks to do it.

Come to the Verification Academy Booth at DAC in San Francisco June 8, 9 and 10 to hear more about UVM Debug and talk in person about your UVM Debug problems. See you then!

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16 May, 2015

In a recent post on deepchip.com John Cooley wrote about “Who Knew VIP?”. In addition, Mark Olen wrote about this same topic on the verification horizon’s blog. So are VIPs becoming more and more popular? Yes!

Here are the big reasons why I believe we are seeing this trend:

  • Ease of Integration
  • Ready made Configurations and Sequences
  • Debug Capabilities

I will be digging deeper on each of these reasons and topics in a three part series on the Verification Horizons BLOG. Today, in part 1 our focus is Easy Integration or EZ VIP.

While developing VIP’s there are various trade off that one has to consider – ease of use vs amount of configuration, protocol specific vs commonality across various protocols. A couple of years ago; when I first got my hands on Mentor’s VIP, there were some features that I really liked and some that I wasn’t familiar with and some that I needed to learn. Over the last couple of years, there have been strides of improvements with ease of use (EZ-VIP) a big one in that list.

EZ-VIP’s is aimed to make it easier to:

  • Make connections between QVIP interfaces and DUT signals
  • Integrate and configure a QVIP in a UVM testbench

EZ-VIP_Productivity

This makes it easier for customers to become productive in hours rather than days.

Connectivity Modules:

Earlier we gave the users the flexibility on the direction of the ports of VIP based on the use modes. The user needed to write certain glue logic apart from setting the directions of the ports.

QVIP_ConnModule

Now we have created new connectivity modules. These connectivity modules enable easy connectivity during integration. These connectivity modules are wrapper around the VIP interface with the needed glue logic, ports having protocol standard names and with the right direction based on the mode e.g. Master, Slave, EP, RC etc. These now enables the user to quickly integrate the QVIP with the DUT.

EZ-VIP_Productivity_1

Quick Starter Kits:

These kits are specific to PCIe and are customized pre-packaged for all major IP vendors, easy-to-use verification environments for the serial and parallel interfaces of PCIe 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and mPCIe, which can be used to verify PHY, Root Complex and Endpoint designs. Users also get example which could be used as reference. These have dramatically reduced bring up time for PCIe QVIP with these IPs to less than a day.

In the part 2 of this series, I will talk about QVIP Configuration and Sequences. Stay tuned and I look forward to hearing your feedback on the series of posts on VIP.

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17 March, 2015

StPatricksDay

With a name like “Fitzpatrick,” you knew I’d be celebrating today, right?

Well, there’s no better way to celebrate this fine day than to announce that our latest edition of Verification Horizons is available online! Now that Spring is almost here, there’s a bit less snow on the ground than there was when I wrote my introduction, but everything is still covered. I’m considering spray-painting it all green in honor of the occasion, so at least it looks like I have a lawn again.

In this issue of Verification Horizons, I’d particularly like to draw your attention to “Successive Refinement: A Methodology for Incremental Specification of Power Intent,” by my friend and colleague Erich Marschner and several of our friends at ARM® Ltd. In this article, you’ll find out how the Unified Power Format (UPF) specification can be used to specify and verify your power architecture abstractly, and then add implementation information later in the process. This methodology is still relatively new in the industry, so if you’re thinking about making your next design PowerAware, you’ll want to read this article to be up on the very latest approach.

In addition to that, we’ve also got Harry Foster discussing some of the results from his latest industry study in “Does Design Size Influence First Silicon Success?” Harry is also blogging about his survey results on Verification Horizons here and here (with more to come).

Our friends at L&T Technology Services Ltd. share some of their experience in doing PowerAware design in “PowerAware RTL Verification of USB 3.0 IPs,” in which you’ll see how UPF can let you explore two different power management architectures for the same RTL.

Next, History class is in session, with Dr. Lauro Rizzatti, long-time EDA guru, giving us part 1 of a 3-part lesson in “Hardware Emulation: Three Decades of Evolution.”

Our friends at Oracle® are up next with “Evolving the Use of Formal Model Checking in SoC Design Verification,” in which they share a case study of their use of formal methods as the central piece in verifying an SoC design they recently completed with first-pass silicon success. By the way, I’d also like to take this opportunity to congratulate the author of this article, Ram Narayan, for his Best Paper award at DVCon(US) 2015. Well done, Ram!

We round out the issue with our famous “Partners’ Corner” section, which includes two articles. In “Small, Maintainable Tests,” our friends at Sondrel IC Design Services show you a few tricks on how to make use of UVM virtual sequences to raise the level of abstraction of your tests. In “Functional Coverage Development Tips: Do’s and Don’ts,” our friends at eInfochips give you a great overview of functional coverage, especially the covergroup and related features in SystemVerilog.

I’d also like to take a moment to thank all of you who came by our Verification Academy booth at DVCon to say hi. I found it incredibly humbling and gratifying to hear from so many of you who have learned new verification skills from the Verification Academy. That’s a big part of why we do what we do, and I appreciate you letting us know about it.

Now, it’s time to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day for real!

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11 February, 2015

Accellera Approves Creation of Portable Stimulus Working Group

At DVCon 2014, Mentor Graphics proposed Accellera launch an exploratory exercise, called a Proposed Working Group (PWG), to determine if there was sufficient interest and need to create a standard in this area.  To help motivate the consideration of this activity, we indicated we would offer our graph-based test specification embodied in our inFact verification tool.

Rapid adoption of our technology has been the trend, especially when used in conjunction within a SystemVerilog UVM testbench environment.  One of the major benefits of UVM has been the portable nature of the testbench to facilitate design verification within and across companies.  The exclusive nature of our graph-based test specification language limits its easy use within the industry leading users to suggest we look to standardize it in keeping with the fundamental UVM principle of testbench portability.

After about a year of discussion in Accellera, the group announced it had concluded there should be an official standards project in this area.  Industry participants have likewise offered quotes of support for the formation of the Accellera Portable Stimulus Working Group.

The challenges to efficient and effective verification continue to grow.  If we stop where we are today in verification algorithm advances and standards the trend to require more people, time or compute resources will continue grow unabated at exponential rates.

For Mentor Graphics part, the verification team here has gone to market with innovative technology that has shown remarkable ability to improve verification productivity and efficiency.  The specification we offer to Accellera to seed this project is the same embodied in technology we used when we partnered with TSMC to validate advanced functional verification technology we announced in 2011.  From that announcement, we shared that tests conducted by AppliedMicro in designs destined for TSMC shortened “time-to-coverage by over 100x.”

One need not wonder if it is possible to shrink a month’s worth of verification tests into less than an 8 hour work day.  It is.  To find out how our specific use of this technology works and what motivates us to support standardization of Portable Stimulus in Accellera, I invite you to visit the Verification Academy where a session on Intelligent Testbench Automation shows what can be done.

And for those who would like to help in the development of the standard and may have technology to further underpin it, you should consider attending the first organizational meeting of the Portable Stimulus Working Group at DVCon 2015 March 5th from 6pm-9pm.  Contact Accellera for member-only meeting details or catch me at DVCon 2015 and I can share more information with you.

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14 January, 2015

“Who Knew?” about verification IP (VIP), was the theme of a recent DeepChip post by John Cooley on December 18.  More specifically the article states, “Who knew VIP was big and that Wally had a good piece of it?”  We knew.

We knew that ASIC and FPGA design engineers can choose to buy design IP from several alternative sources or build their own, but that does not help with the problem of verification.  We knew that you don’t really want to rely on the same source that designed your IP, to test it.  We knew that you don’t want to write and maintain bus functional models (BFMs) or more complete VIP for standard protocols.  Not that you couldn’t, but why would you if you don’t have to?

We also knew that verification teams want easy-to-use VIP that is built on a standard foundation of SystemVerilog, compliant with a protocol’s specification, and is easily configurable to your implementation.  That way it integrates into your verification environment just as easily as if you had built it yourself.

Leading design IP providers such as ARM®, PLDA, and Northwest Logic knew that Mentor Graphics’ VIP is built on standards, is protocol compliant, and is easy to use.  In fact you can read more about what Jim Wallace, systems and software group director at ARM; Stephane Hauradou, CTO of PLDA; and Brian Daellenbach, president of Northwest Logic; have to say about Mentor Graphics’ recently introduced EZ-VIP technology for PCIe 4.0 (at this website http://www.mentor.com/company/news/mentor-verification-ip-pcie-4 ), and why they know that their customers can rely on it as well.

Verification engineers knew, too.  You can read comments from many of them (at Cooley’s website http://www.deepchip.com/items/dac14-06.html ), about their opinions on VIP.  In addition, Mercury Systems also knew.  “Mentor Graphics PCIe VIP is fully compliant with the PCIe protocol specification and with UVM coding guidelines. We found that we could drop it into our existing environment and get it up and running very quickly”, said Nick Solimini, Consulting DV Engineer at Mercury Systems. “Mentor’s support for their VIP is excellent. All our technical questions were answered promptly so we were able to be productive throughout the project”.

So, now you know,  Mentor Graphics’ Questa VIP is built on standard SV UVM, is specification compliant, is easy to get up and running and is an integral part of many successful verification environments today.  If you’d like to learn more about Questa VIP and Mentor Graphics’ EZ-VIP technology, send me an email, and I’ll let you in on what (thanks to Cooley and our customers) is no longer the best kept secret in verification.  Who knew?

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