Part 2: The 2012 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study

Design Trends (Continued)

In Part 1 of this series of blogs, I focused on design trends (click here) as identified by the 2012 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here). In this blog, I continue presenting the study findings related to design trends, with a focus on embedded processor, DSP, and on-chip bussing trends.

Embedded Processors

In Figure 1, we see the percentage of today’s designs by the number of embedded processor cores. It’s interesting to note that 79 percent of all non-FPGA designs (in green) contain one or more embedded processors and could be classified as an SoC, which are inherently more difficult to verify than designs without embedded processors. Also note that 55 percent of all FPGA designs (in red) contain one or more embedded processors. 

Figure 1. Number of embedded processor cores

Figure 2 shows the trends in terms of the number of embedded processor cores for non-FPGA designs. The comparison includes the 2004 Collett study (in dark green), the 2007 Far West Research study (in gray), and the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in green). 

Figure 2. Trends: Number of embedded processor cores

For reference, between the 2010 and 2012 Wilson Research Group study, we did not see a significant change in the number of embedded processors for FPGA designs. The results look essentially the same as the red curve in Figure 1.

Another way to look at the data is to calculate the mean number of embedded processors that are being designed in by SoC projects around the world. In Figure 3, you can see the continual rise in the mean number of embedded processor cores, where the mean was about 1.06 in 2004 (in dark green). This mean increased in 2007(in gray) to 1.46. Then, it increased again in 2010 (in blue) to 2.14. Today (in green) the mean number of embedded processors is 2.25. Of course, this calculation represents the industry average—where some projects are creating designs with many embedded processors, while other projects are creating designs with few or none.

It’s also important to note here that the analysis is per project, and it does not represent the number of embedded processors in terms of silicon volume (i.e., production). Some projects might be creating designs that result in high volume, while other projects are creating designs with low volume. 

Figure 3. Trends: Mean number of embedded processor core

Another interesting way to look at the data is to partition it into design sizes (for example, less than 5M gates, 5M to 20M gates, greater than 20M gates), and then calculate the mean number of embedded processors by design size. The results are shown in Figure 4, and as you would expect, the larger the design, the more embedded processor cores.

Figure 4. Non-FPGA mean embedded processor cores by design size

Platform-based SoC design approaches (i.e., designs containing multiple embedded processor cores with lots of third-party and internally developed IP) have driven the demand for common bus architectures. In Figure 5 we see the percentage of today’s designs by the type of on-chip bus architecture for both FPGA (in red) and non-FPGA (in green) designs.

Figure 5. On-chip bus architecture adoption

Figure 6 shows the trends in terms of on-chip bus architecture adoption for Non-FPGA designs. The comparison includes the 2007 Far West Research study (in gray), the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in blue), and the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in green). Note that there was about a 250 percent reported increase in Non-FPGA design projects using the ARM AMBA bus architecture between the years 2007 and ??. 

Figure 6. Trends: Non-FPGA on-chip bus architecture adoption  

Figure 7 shows the trends in terms of on-chip bus architecture adoption for FPGA designs. The comparison includes the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in pink), and the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in red). Note that there was about a 163 percent increase in FPGA design projects using the ARM AMBA bus architecture between the years 2010 and 2012. 

Figure 7. FPGA on-chip bus architecture adoption trends

In Figure 8 we see the percentage of today’s designs by the number of embedded DSP cores for both FPGA designs (in red) and non-FPGA designs (in green).

Figure 8. Number of embedded DSP cores

Figure 9 shows the trends in terms of the number of embedded DSP cores for non-FPGA designs. The comparison includes the 2007 Far West Research study (in grey), the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in blue), and the 2012 Wilson Research Group study (in green).

 

Figure 9. Trends: Number of embedded DSP core

In my next blog (click here), I’ll present clocking and power trends.

Post Author

Posted June 26th, 2013, by

Post Tags

, , , , , ,

Post Comments

7 Comments

About Verification Horizons BLOG

This blog will provide an online forum to provide weekly updates on concepts, values, standards, methodologies and examples to assist with the understanding of what advanced functional verification technologies can do and how to most effectively apply them. We're looking forward to your comments and suggestions on the posts to make this a useful tool. Verification Horizons BLOG

@dennisbrophy Tweets

  • Loading tweets...

@dave_59 Tweets

  • Loading tweets...

@HarryAtMentor Tweets

  • Loading tweets...

Comments

7 comments on this post | ↓ Add Your Own

[...] my next blog (click here), I’ll continue discussing current design trends, focusing specifically on embedded processors, [...]

[...] Part 2 – Design Trends (continued) [...]

Commented on July 2, 2013 at 11:42 am
By Processors Everywhere, but Tools Lacking « Reviews Technology

[...] Wilson Research study conducted during 2012 for EDA company Mentor Graphics, and referenced at Mentor’s website, shows that 79 percent of all non-FPGA designs now contain one or more processors, and even 56 [...]

[...] Part 2 of this series of blogs, I continued the discussion focused on design trends (click here) as identified by the 2012 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (click here). In [...]

[...] ask is, “What is driving this trend?” In some of my earlier blogs (click here for Part 1 and Part 2) I showed an that design complexity is increasing in terms design sizes and number of embedded [...]

Commented on April 22, 2014 at 10:28 am
By Giuseppe

We are a flock a group of volunteers and opening
a new scheme in our community. Your website provided us with valuable
and work on . You a formidable process and our whole
group can be thankful to you .
Unquestionably Account which you stated .

Your favorite reason appeared to be on the web easy thing to take note of .
I tell you , i definitely get annoyed same as any
other people think concerns not know about .
You controlled and also defined on all managed to hit the nail on the top no need side-effects ,
others cAN could take a signal. Will likely be again
to get more. Thank you

Also visit my website: Deer hunter 2014 cheats

Commented on April 23, 2014 at 7:37 am
By Dorine

I was very pleased to find this great site. I need to to thank you for
your time due to this fantastic read!! I definitely loved every little bit
of it and i also have you saved as a favorite to look at new information in
your site.
I’m sure all of you below perform Group Fortress two, or else you wouldn’t be here!
I also play TF2, and one point that I couldn’t get my head all around was gathering all the items!!
I’v noticed some gamers cant even acquire most of the items,
never mind ALL of them!! I was committed to acquiring all the things, but it appeared extremely hard, so
becoming an skilled programmer, I acquired to perform!

Right after hrs of hard perform I developed, what I say one of the very best hacks out there!

(biased much?!) The resource that I have produced
enables you to unlock any of the products you would like in TF2!

I’ts simple genuinely…
I was arranging to market this resource and let some cash start rolling in, but i know the
sensation of not being in a position to pay for it, or becoming a ‘poor’ dude on TF2,
so I have decided to give this out for totally free to see what men
and women feel of it! Just study the tutorial
beneath outlining how to obtain and use the tool!

Also visit my weblog :: tf2 items generator

Add Your Comment

Archives