Archive for May, 2011

13 May, 2011

Language and Library Trends

This blog is a continuation of a series of blogs, which present the highlights from the 2010 Wilson Research Group Functional Verification Study (for a background on the study, click here).

In my previous blog (Part 7 click here), I focused on some of the 2010 Wilson Research Group findings related to testbench characteristics and simulation strategies. In this blog, I present design and verification language trends, as identified by the Wilson Research Group study.

You might note for some of the language and library data I present, the percentage sums to more than one hundred percent. The reason for this is that some perticipant’s projects use multiple languages and multiple methodologies.

Design Languages

Let’s begin by examining the languages used for design, as shown in Figure 1.  Here, we compare the results for languages used to design FPGAs (in grey) with languages used to design non-FPGAs (in green).

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Figure 1. Languages used for design

Not too surprising, we see that VHDL is the most popular language used for the design of FPGAs, while Verilog and SystemVerilog are the most popular languages used for the design of non-FPGAs.

Figure 2 shows the trends in terms of languages used for design, by comparing the 2007 Far West Research study (in blue) with the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in green), as well as the projected design language adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple). Note that the design language adoption is declining for most of the languages with the exception of SystemVerilog whose adoption is increasing.

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Figure 2. Trends in languages used for design

Verification Languages

Next, let’s look at the languages used for verification (that is, languages used to create simulation testbenches). Figure 3 compares the results between FPGA designs (in grey) and non-FPGA designs (in green). p8-slide3

Figure 3. Languages used in verification to create simulation testbenches

And again, it’s not too surprising to see that VHDL is the most popular language used to create verification testbenches for FPGAs, while SystemVerilog  is the most popular language used to create testbenches for non-FPGAs.

Figure 4 shows the trends in terms of languages used to create simulation testbenches by comparing the 2007 Far West Research study (in blue) with the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in green), as well as the projected language adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple). Note that verification language adoption is declining for most of the languages with the exception of SystemVerilog whose adoption is increasing.

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Figure 4. Trends in languages used in verification to create simulation testbenches

Now, let’s look at methodology and class library adoption. Figure 5 shows the future trends in terms of methodology and class library adoption by comparing the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in green) with the projected adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple). Previous studies did not include data on methodology and class library adoption, so we are unable to show previous trends.

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Figure 5. Methodology and class library future trends

The study indicates that the only methodology adoption projected to grow in the next twelve months are OVM and UVM. 

Assertion Languages and Libraries

Finally, let’s examine assertion language and library adoption, as shown in Figure 6.  Here, we compare the results for FPGA designs (in grey) and non-FPGA designs (in green).

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Figure 6. Assertion language and library adoption

SystemVerilog Assertions (SVA) is the most popular assertion language used for both FPGA and non-FPGA designs.

Figure 7 shows the trends in terms assertion language and library adoption by comparing the 2007 Far West Research study (in blue) with the 2010 Wilson Research Group study (in green), as well as the projected adoption trends within the next twelve months (in purple). Note that the adoption of most of the assertion languages is declining, with the exception of SVA whose adoption is increasing.

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Figure 7. Trends in assertion language and library adoption

In my next blog (click here), I plan to focus on the adoption of various verification technologies and techniques used in the industry, as identified by the 2010 Wilson Research Group study.

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12 May, 2011

The standards developing organizations defining and updating front-end EDA standards will be at DAC in force.  And from the looks of if, they are getting an early start to DAC with updates on IEEE, Accellera and OSCI standards at Sunday workshops.  The Sunday workshops may be of particular interest to verification engineers interested in UVM and systems designers interested in SystemC AMS.

Following the workshops, there will be a half-day meeting of the North American SystemC Users Group on Monday where users will share their SystemC experiences.  The following morning, Accellera will host its annual DAC breakfast where the UVM users will meet to share their experiences.  A lively conversation is expected.

Sunday – June 5, 2011

UVM LogoDAC Workshop on Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) – Verifying Blocks to IP to SOCs and Systems

Time: 10:00 AM — 1:00 PM
Location: San Diego Convention Center Room 33A
Summary: The Accellera Verification IP Technical Subcommittee (VIP-TSC), building on over two years of work by verification experts from around the world, released Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) in February 2011. This workshop, presented by expert verification methodology architects and engineers, will provide an example-based overview of UVM to chip and SOC design and verification engineers of all skill levels on the first open-source verification methodology to be fully supported and endorsed by all major EDA vendors, and many end-user and consulting companies.
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Registration: This is an official DAC sponsored event and DAC registration required.


systemc_amsDAC Workshop on Using the Power of the SystemC AMS Extensions

Time: 10:00 AM — 6:00 PM
Location: San Diego Convention Center Room 33B
Summary: Today’s embedded systems interact more and more tightly with the analog physical environment; where digital HW/SW subsystems become functionally interwoven with analog/mixed-signal (AMS) blocks such as RF interfaces, power electronics, or sensors and actuators. Examples are software defined radios, sensor networks, automotive applications, or systems for image sensing. This requires new means to model and simulate the interaction between AMS subsystems and HW/SW subsystems at functional and architecture levels. Especially for this purpose, the SystemC language standard has been extended with powerful AMS capabilities to tackle the challenges in heterogeneous electronic system-level (ESL) design. You will get a good working knowledge of SystemC AMS by attending the workshop.
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Registration: This is an official DAC sponsored event and DAC registration required.

Monday – June 6, 2011

SystemC Logo

North American SystemC Users Group Meeting

Time: 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: OMNI Hotel
Room Salon AB
675 Laurel Street
San Diego, CA 92101
Summary: The North American SystemC Users Group  explores the newest advancements in sustainable and flexible solutions for system-level design using SystemC.
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Registration: This event is free and open to all registered DAC attendees. Click here to reserve your seat

Tuesday – June 7, 2011

accelleraAccellera Breakfast at DAC: UVM User Experiences

Time: 7:00 AM – 8:30 AM
Location: San Diego Convention Center Room 25AB
Summary: With the introduction of Accellera’s Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) user interest and adoption has been rapidly growing. You are invited to join us and share the experience with fellow users. During the breakfast, you will hear from real users who have migrated to, and/or applied, the UVM for the first time.  Accellera Verification IP Technical Subcommittee (VIP-TSC) participants will provide their insights on UVM. We invite you to take part in the open discussion to foster greater adoption of this important verification standard.
GET MORE DETAILS

Registration: This event is free open to all registered DAC attendees. Click here to reserve your seat

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