Made in China, Part 3

Oppland Corp. Ltd., a media company that the China Commercial Aircraft Summit, describes China as “the world’s most dynamic market for commercial airplanes” and forecasts China “to require 3,770 new commercial airplanes, valued at $490 billion over the next 20 years”.

The mil/aero industry has undoubtedly taken note of China’s growing aerospace market. Boeing has assigned sales executives to China. Industry research firms—such as ReportLinker with its report, entitled “China aerospace manufacturing industry, 2010”—are actively gather intelligence from governmental statistics organizations, market research (monitoring) centers, industry associations and institutions, import and export statistics organizations, and other sources.

Various governments have also taken notice. The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission solicited for the “submission of proposals to provide a one-time unclassified report on the development of China’s aviation and aerospace industries, and the potential impacts on future U.S. economic and national security.” It appears virtually everyone is hungry for detailed insight into China’s aerospace manufacturing industry, market drivers, enterprises and strategies, technologies and investments, risks, and trends.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration (ITA) Aerospace & Defense Technologies Team and Foreign Commercial Service in China have organized an Aerospace Supplier Development Mission to China during November 7-17, 2010. As described in the ITA’s Federal Register dated July 13, 2010 (Volume 75, Number 133): “China’s aerospace sector ranks among the world’s most dynamic, going far beyond the country’s massive investment in aircraft (4,000 by 2025). Chinese aerospace companies have rapidly developed into serious players in the industry’s global value chain, and they are in a greater position than ever to frequently make their own sourcing decisions, participate as ‘risk sharing partners’ in new airframe and engine development programs, and taking on the role of first-tier suppliers on Chinese programs.

Next month, Airshow China 2010 will include an exhibition by Aviation Industry Corp. of China (AVIC), which a company representative has called “China’s aircraft-making giant.” AVIC will showcase two types of China-made aircraft: the Seagull 300 and the Little Eagle-500. Also making its debut is China Aviation Industry General Aircraft Co., Ltd. (AVICGA), an AVIC subsidiary.

Air Show China 2010

Air Show China 2010

“The goals of the 2010 Aerospace Supply Chain Development Mission to China are threefold: (1) To introduce U.S. companies to Chinese joint-venture groups and Western original equipment manufacturers (OEMs); (2) to explore supplier opportunities under other aerospace programs (including Chinese programs and Western programs with Chinese firms ‘risk sharing’’); and (3) to facilitate an effective U.S. presence at Airshow China,” reads the document.

Next month, Airshow China 2010 will include an exhibition by Aviation Industry Corp. of China (AVIC), which a company representative has called “China’s aircraft-making giant.” AVIC will showcase two types of China-made aircraft: the Seagull 300 and the Little Eagle-500. Also making its debut is China Aviation Industry General Aircraft Co., Ltd. (AVICGA), an AVIC subsidiary.

Seagull 300 is being called the first indigenous, amphibious plane developed by China, and it is expected to begin mass production next year. According to Meng Xiangkai, general manager of AVICGA, China holds tremendous potential in general aviation given its rapidly growing economy.

The Chinese Made Seagull 300 Light Multi-functional Amphibious Plane

The Chinese Made Seagull 300 Light Multi-functional Amphibious Plane

General aviation includes commercial, business, and private aircraft, including state and local flight activities, such as air ambulances, police aircraft, aerial firefighting, bush flying, gliding and skydiving, etc.

Is China making inroads in military aviation, this geek ponders. You betcha. Be sure to take in the fourth and final installment of “Made in China.”

Here are links to Made in China part one and two.

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Posted October 27th, 2010, by

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About J. VanDomelen Mil/Aero Blog

J. VanDomelen holds a Bachelor of Science in Information Systems and myriad certifications from Microsoft, Cisco, and CompTia in varying facets of computer software, hardware, and network design and implementation. He has worked in the electronics industry for more than 12 years in varied fields, including advanced systems design of highly technical military and aerospace computer systems, semiconductor manufacturing, open source software development, hardware design, and rapid prototyping. J. VanDomelen Mil/Aero Blog

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Commented on October 31, 2010 at 1:46 pm
By Made in China, Part 4 « J. VanDomelen Mil/Aero Blog

[...] February 2010, China debuted its first China-made commercial airplane, as well as its first amphibious plane. Two months later, in April 2010, China unveiled four [...]

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