Posts Tagged ‘Nucleus RTOS’

1 September, 2014

As I mentioned on a previous occasion, I always welcome questions whenever I make a presentation, do a web seminar, write an article or blog post or whatever. Even very simple queries give me ideas for topics to discuss. I always take the view that, if one engineer poses a question, there are probably a bunch of guys who would also like the answer.

Once again, I am turning my attention to C++ … Read the rest of this entry »

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18 August, 2014

Although I enjoy writing articles and blogs and giving presentations – I am always hoping that I can impart some useful information and help engineers with their projects – the Q&A session after a presentation is often the moist interesting part. If I am doing a Web seminar, for example, I normally have a one hour slot; I try to talk for no more than 20-25 minutes, leaving plenty of time for Q&A. I find that so often it is the questions that trigger ideas for articles, blogs and further presentations. So, please keep them coming – comment here or email are always options.

I attended a recent Web seminar at which there were lots of interesting questions … Read the rest of this entry »

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21 July, 2014

Multicore continues to be a hot topic, as an ever-increasing number of embedded systems are designed with multiple CPUs – most commonly multiple cores on a chip. One of the challenges with understanding multicore is that the term actually covers a number of architectures and approaches to design. This is a topic that I have discussed somewhat before, but the increasing popularity of multicore and additional technology options make it a topic worth revisiting.

Figuring out the terminology is the first challenge … Read the rest of this entry »

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3 March, 2014

Last week, as I previously previewed, was Embedded World in Nuremberg, Germany. Now that I am back home, footsore and tired [and still harboring the symptoms of a head cold that makes traveling even less fun than normal], I can reflect on my experiences.

When I return from such events, it is always expected that I will have gained a firm impression of what the event was all about and what trends were apparent … Read the rest of this entry »

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17 February, 2014

Embedded systems are evolving – that is blindingly obvious. But that does not just mean that we are finding more and more uses for smart devices. It also means that embedded applications, that have been around for some years, are becoming more sophisticated. A few examples: central heating controllers, intruder alarms, kitchen appliances, scientific and medical instruments … The list goes on.

The increased sophistication commonly occurs in two areas. The first is connectivity [networking]. The second, and often more challenging, one is the user interface [UI] … Read the rest of this entry »

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12 February, 2014

The Internet of Things is a big issue right now, which I wrote about a few months back. Tomorrow I am moderating a Google hangout titled “Internet of Things (IoT) Connectivity for Embedded Devices” where some experts will discussing this important matter. You can register here and will have the chance to pose questions online. If you cannot attend, a recording of the session will be available afterwards.

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10 February, 2014

Apart from writing about embedded software matters, I also read widely and enjoy the perspectives offered by many of the key figures in the field. One writer, who always gets my attention, is Jim Turley. Jim is never afraid of raising contentious issues and tends to take something of a chip-centric view of embedded systems.

He seemed surprised, in a recent article, to find that engineers’ priorities might be different … Read the rest of this entry »

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4 March, 2013

I recall a few years ago, I was at the Embedded Systems Conference in San Jose, CA. We had a presentation theater on the booth and my job was to manage it. That meant that I got to do some of the presentations and persuaded colleagues to do others. One session, that was not mine, was particularly successful. I am not sure whether this was because of the unique style of the presenter or the words she used. One particular word in fact: “free”.

I am going to try it. Hey guys! How about some free software … Read the rest of this entry »

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14 June, 2010

I often get emails from students asking me how to get started in a career in embedded software. I have to assume that they think that this is a path to a well paid job and a corresponding glamorous lifestyle. I would hate to disillusion someone who is just setting out on life. I guess that I had great expectations too.

I am never able to give detailed advice on what to do and just comment that embedded software engineers actually come in several flavors. At one extreme, they are engineers with a deep knowledge of hardware and only do a bit of software when necessary; such skills are ideal for developing drivers and other low level code. At the other extreme, there are programmers who have no idea about embedded systems, but are focused on the application domain; there skill set is not very different from a software engineer working on applications for Windows or Linux. And, in the middle, are guys who understand real time behavior and real time operating systems.

The nearest to advice that I can give, apart from obviously recommending my book, is to explain how I got into embedded … Read the rest of this entry »

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Meet Colin Walls

I have over twenty-five years experience in the electronics industry, largely dedicated to embedded software. When not working, I enjoy photography, books and music. Learn more about me, including my go-to karaoke song and the best parts of being British.

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